Falklands - Page 3




 
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September 1st, 2012  
03USMC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tankboy
He is Haggis shearing no doubt.
So shearing is what the Scots are calling it now?
View Post Old September 3rd, 2012
NP8901
This post has been down-ranked. Click "View Post" to view it.
September 3rd, 2012  
hawky94
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NP8901
Well children, gather around and i'll tell you a story and mighty bored you'll be.

I was part of the RM detachment NP8901 aboard the HMS Endurance when our OC, Lt. Mills was ordered to Grytviken on South Georgia to create a defense potion. Judging by radio transmissions it would be argentinas next target. April 3, the Argentine Polar Transporter Bahia Paraiso had entered the bay and called on os to assemble on the beach to surrender. By now the Argentine frigate Guerrico also entered the bay. Lt. Mills played for time by reading the message back and the Argentines was informed that there were British forces present on the island with orders to withstand a landing. Mills had used an HF network for his communication because he knew that the Navy would pick up this type of radio transmissions.

After a few minutes of silence, two Puma helicopters appeared. One landed about 40 yards from our position and dropped approx. 8 Argentine Marines. The other landed on the other side of the bay and dropped an unknown number of Marines. The Argentines on the other side of the bay opened fire with a machine gun and Mills had to jump head down into our defensive position while he gave the order to return fire.

The Puma helicopter on our side was trying to take-off but was hit by so many rounds that it crashed on the other side of the bay. There was no movement from the crew. Two Alouette helicopters that were trying to dispose of their troops on the other side of the bay were fired upon and one was hit so hard that it had to make an emergency landing and was out of action.

Guerrico came closer to land and gave fire support from its 100mm cannon. Lt. Mills gave us orders to wait until the ship was so far inside the bay that its ability to maneuver was reduced and then open fire with everything we had. Then the Argentines made a mistake, they turned broadside to us and we opened up with all the firepower we had. Now, a frigate is a pretty large target and it shook under the impact of thousands of rounds. Ma. Combes fired his 84mm Carl Gustav AT against the ship and hit it just above the waterline. The AT hit had damaged some electrical cables included the ones to the 100mm cannon that now became pretty worthless. The aft 40mm was still working until Ma. Parsons and Chubb cut down the crew with their LMG.

Argentines now knew that they had to get out of the bay and as the ship came about, Sergeant Major Leach who lay on high ground with a sniper rifle began firing at the bridge and the crew had to dance the monkey dance. Ma. Combes fired a second AT round that hit the hull just below the Exocets launcher. We also managed to hit the ship with two 66 mm LAW close to the front turret. We had been fighting a warship and won.

While this battle went on more troops had come ashore and were closing in to outflank os. After causing a number of casualties, and with retreat cut off, Lt. Mills took the initiative to parley with the enemy. We had a wounded man (Cpl Peters was hit in the arm by a rifle round) and Mills had achived his aim of forcing the Argentines to use force. Mills was prepared to surrender to prevent further blood shed and that was accepted by Lieutenant Commander Astiz.

I'll never forget his face, when he after receiving the surrender of 22 Royal Marines asked Lt. Mills and where the rest of his Company was and the Lt. with a big smile replied that this was his full "Company".

We were interned in Argentina and interrogated to their great frustration because all we gave was our name, rank and number. They probably had the means to get us to talk but did not have the balls to do so since the whole world knew that we were their prisoners. On the 16 we were flown to Uruguay and handed over to the British Embassy.

Lieutenant Mills was awarded the DSC, Sergeant Major Leach the DSM, Marine Combes was mentioned in Dispatches. the rest of us received a Well Done. I returned to the Falklands with the Forty-Commando. There was something that had to be done!

But that's another story.
In a word. Incredible, and even that isn't accurate.

You, Sir, and indeed all of the Royal Marines on that day showed bravery, the likes of which many could only ever dream of having. I can't really think of any words to say which describes my admiration.

So, I'll just say thank you.
--
September 3rd, 2012  
Freyja
 
Amazing!
Never known the story before. The mouse kicking the elephant in the balls.


Well done.
September 3rd, 2012  
Der Alte
 
Great craftsmanship.
Surprise is often a good way to win the battle.
September 3rd, 2012  
42RM
 
Let me buy you a pint mate.


Well, what the hell, ten
September 3rd, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Bloody Brilliant Colour, again you have my utmost respect.
September 3rd, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NP8901
Well children, gather around and i'll tell you a story and mighty bored you'll be.

I was part of the RM detachment NP8901 aboard the HMS Endurance when our OC, Lt. Mills was ordered to Grytviken on South Georgia to create a defense potion. Judging by radio transmissions it would be argentinas next target. April 3, the Argentine Polar Transporter Bahia Paraiso had entered the bay and called on os to assemble on the beach to surrender. By now the Argentine frigate Guerrico also entered the bay. Lt. Mills played for time by reading the message back and the Argentines was informed that there were British forces present on the island with orders to withstand a landing. Mills had used an HF network for his communication because he knew that the Navy would pick up this type of radio transmissions.

After a few minutes of silence, two Puma helicopters appeared. One landed about 40 yards from our position and dropped approx. 8 Argentine Marines. The other landed on the other side of the bay and dropped an unknown number of Marines. The Argentines on the other side of the bay opened fire with a machine gun and Mills had to jump head down into our defensive position while he gave the order to return fire.

The Puma helicopter on our side was trying to take-off but was hit by so many rounds that it crashed on the other side of the bay. There was no movement from the crew. Two Alouette helicopters that were trying to dispose of their troops on the other side of the bay were fired upon and one was hit so hard that it had to make an emergency landing and was out of action.

Guerrico came closer to land and gave fire support from its 100mm cannon. Lt. Mills gave us orders to wait until the ship was so far inside the bay that its ability to maneuver was reduced and then open fire with everything we had. Then the Argentines made a mistake, they turned broadside to us and we opened up with all the firepower we had. Now, a frigate is a pretty large target and it shook under the impact of thousands of rounds. Ma. Combes fired his 84mm Carl Gustav AT against the ship and hit it just above the waterline. The AT hit had damaged some electrical cables included the ones to the 100mm cannon that now became pretty worthless. The aft 40mm was still working until Ma. Parsons and Chubb cut down the crew with their LMG.

Argentines now knew that they had to get out of the bay and as the ship came about, Sergeant Major Leach who lay on high ground with a sniper rifle began firing at the bridge and the crew had to dance the monkey dance. Ma. Combes fired a second AT round that hit the hull just below the Exocets launcher. We also managed to hit the ship with two 66 mm LAW close to the front turret. We had been fighting a warship and won.

While this battle went on more troops had come ashore and were closing in to outflank os. After causing a number of casualties, and with retreat cut off, Lt. Mills took the initiative to parley with the enemy. We had a wounded man (Cpl Peters was hit in the arm by a rifle round) and Mills had achived his aim of forcing the Argentines to use force. Mills was prepared to surrender to prevent further blood shed and that was accepted by Lieutenant Commander Astiz.

I'll never forget his face, when he after receiving the surrender of 22 Royal Marines asked Lt. Mills where the rest of his Company was and the Lt. with a big smile replied that this was his full "Company".

We were interned in Argentina and interrogated to their great frustration because all we gave was our name, rank and number. They probably had the means to get us to talk but did not have the balls to do so since the whole world knew that we were their prisoners. On the 16 we were flown to Uruguay and handed over to the British Embassy.

Lieutenant Mills was awarded the DSC, Sergeant Major Leach the DSM, Marine Combes was mentioned in Dispatches. the rest of us received a Well Done. I returned to the Falklands with Forty-Commando. There was something that had to be done!

But that's another story.
Hitting a warship, not once, but twice, with an 84mm rifle- man... that is awesome... Not only that, you guys hit with some other weapon like the LAW and small arms fire....

All this, with the fact thaT you guys were outnumbered. Reminds me of the motto of the Phillipnes Constabulary- Outnumbered always, outgunned, Never!

That is something for the future generations to ponder...
September 3rd, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Bloody Brilliant Colour, again you have my utmost respect.
I have heard about this, mostly because the Carl Gustav anti-tank weapon from the officers during my basic training. You have my respect, Marine

What is a Colour Sergeant?
September 3rd, 2012  
The Highway Man
 
Colour sergeant in days of old were responsible for the security and safe keeping of the regimental battle colours.
 


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