Dirty and clean nuclear devices.




 
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July 20th, 2005  
Italian Guy
 
 

Topic: Dirty and clean nuclear devices.


Hi y'all. Can anyone explain me the difference between a regular nuclear bomb and a so-called dirty nuke? Or direct me to a link or something.
Thank you.
July 20th, 2005  
SwordFish_13
 
 
Hi,

The term dirty bomb is most often used to refer to a Radiological Dispersal Device ................ It combines the radioactive material with conventional explosives .


Conventional Explosives are used to Dispence the Radioactive material over a large area ............... In A Conventional Nuclear Bomb the Initial Explosen would have had more Immidiate leathel affect.

A Dirty Bomb is not a Nuke or Nuclear Bomb .

This is How www.answers.com Defines it

Quote:
Dirty Bomb

A dirty bomb is a bomb made of conventional explosives, like TNT, with the addition of radioactive isotopes, designed to spread over a wide area. Dirty bombs are less devastating than nuclear devices, but easier to create.
This is How Nukepills.com Definees it

Quote:
Dirty Bombs

A "dirty bomb" is a conventional explosive, such as dynamite, salted with radioactive waste that scatters when the bomb goes off. It is not a nuclear bomb. The bomb can kill or injure through the initial blast of the conventional explosive and possibly through the dispersal of the radioactive materials-- hence the term "dirty." Such bombs could be small devices or as big as a truck bomb. There are four categories of radioactive waste ranging from very low-level waste that can be safely disposed of with ordinary refuse, to high-level waste such as spent nuclear fuel. Substantial amounts of radioactive waste are generated through civilian and military applications of radionuclides in medical facilities, food irradiation plants, chemical and manufacturing plants, etc. Some types of radioactive waste would be easier to obtain than others in order to make a "dirty bomb". Which brings us to Potassium Iodide. Radioactive iodine, of which Potassium Iodide protects against (see below), would most likely not be present in a dirty bomb due to the fact that it is a byproduct of nuclear fission which takes place only within nuclear reactors and during the detonation of a nuclear bomb. Obviously this type of 'radioactive waste' would be very difficult to obtain and incorporate in the makings of a dirty bomb. If a dirty bomb detonates in your area, follow the instructions of local health officials concerning evacuation, decontamination and the administering of potassium iodide (though unlikely). A dirty bomb could very well contain radioactive waste such as Cesium-137, found in the waste of nuclear power plants, and Thallium. The FDA has encouraged manufacturers to develop a "dirty bomb pill", known as Prussian Blue, to counteract the deadly effects of this type of radiation. Unfornately, the FDA has so far only approved one manufacturer, located in Germany, and there product is not available in this country through your physician.

Peace
-=SF_13=-
July 21st, 2005  
Italian Guy
 
 
Thank you very much, Sword_Fish. 8)
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July 21st, 2005  
Damien435
 
 
Iraq was working on building a dirty bomb using depleted uranium pellets before Israel blasted the hell out of their nuclear reactor in Bagdad.
July 21st, 2005  
Italian Guy
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damien435
Iraq was working on building a dirty bomb using depleted uranium pellets before Israel blasted the h**l out of their nuclear reactor in Bagdad.
Ozirak? I see.
July 22nd, 2005  
Galaxy
 
that's good
July 22nd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Nuclear bombs vary in how "clean" they are as well. That is to say, how much fallout they generate. For instance, Russian nukes are much "dirtier" than US nukes as they generate a significantly larger amount of fallout.

But the term "dirty bomb" does apply to using radioactive dust/particulate, etc. to radiate a given area. The effect of fallout without the detonation of a nuke.
July 22nd, 2005  
Italian Guy
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charge 7
Nuclear bombs vary in how "clean" they are as well. That is to say, how much fallout they generate. For instance, Russian nukes are much "dirtier" than US nukes as they generate a significantly larger amount of fallout.

But the term "dirty bomb" does apply to using radioactive dust/particulate, etc. to radiate a given area. The effect of fallout without the detonation of a nuke.
So I guess the dirtier the bomb the less advanced its tech right?
July 25th, 2005  
EnigmaNZ
 
You were asking about dirty nuclear bombs, not dirty bombs which are entirely different. Dirty bombs combine traditional explosives with radioactive material but are not nuclear bombs as there is no fission or fusion envolved.
Say you want to create a 15-20 kiloton bomb, you can do this 3 ways. One is to build a fission bomb like the ones used on Japan in 1945, Fatman used 6kg of Plutonium and 260kg of Uranium, Little boy used 60kg of uranium. These are dirty bombs in that there is a lot of fallout from the explosion. Another way is to make a salted bomb, this is a fission bomb with a fusion shell desgned to produce the neutrons to ignite a outer uranium layer, or tamper. this also makes for a dirty bomb thanks to the large use of uranium. The third way is to use the smallest ammount of uranium or plutonium possible and use it as the igniter for a fusion outer shell. I think the smallest fission yield able to be used is about 0.3 kilotons, this is enough to fuse the lithium outer shell creating most of the yield, the fission core is the sparkplug. Around 2 kg of plutonium or about 6 kg of uranium is sufficient for this. This is referred to as a clean bomb as there is little fallout compared to the other types. By adding additional fusion stages the yield can be greatly increased without using more dirty trigger material. The w-80 warhead has yields from 0.3 kiloton using just the sparkplug, to 170 kt with the outer fusion stages.

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclop...-weapon-design

The term has also been used historically to refer to certain types of nuclear weapons. Due to the inefficiency of early nuclear weapons (such as "Fat Man" and "Little Boy"), 2% or less of the nuclear material would be consumed during the explosion. Thus, they tended to disperse large amounts of unused fissile material in the form of nuclear fallout. During the 1950s, there was considerable debate over whether "clean" bombs could be produced, and these were often contrasted with "dirty" bombs. "Clean" bombs were often a stated goal, and scientists and administrators said that high-efficiency nuclear weapon design could create explosions which generated almost all of their energy in the form of nuclear fusion, which does not create harmful fission products. But the Castle Bravo accident of in 1954, in which a thermonuclear weapon produced a large amount of fallout which was dispersed among many human populations, suggested that this was not what was actually being used in modern thermonuclear weapons, which derive around half of their yield from a final fission stage. While some proposed producing "clean" weapons, other theorists note that one could make a nuclear weapon intentionally "dirty" by "salting" it with a material (most commonly a type of cobalt) which would generate large amounts of long-lasting fallout when irradiated by the weapon core. In the post-Cold War age, this usage of the term has largely fallen out of use. The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... A post-war Fat Man model. ... Little Boy bomb casing Little Boy was the codename given to the nuclear weapon dropped on Hiroshima, Japan on Monday, August 6, 1945. ... This article or section should be merged with Fissile Fissile material is composed of atoms that can undergo nuclear fission and sustain a fission chain reaction. ... Fallout is the residual radiation hazard from a nuclear explosion and is named from the fact that it falls out of the atmosphere in to which it is spread during the explosion. ... The first nuclear weapons, though large, cumbersome and inefficient, provided the basic design building blocks of all future weapons. ... The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction is considered the most promising for producing fusion power. ... Fission products are the residues of fission processes. ... Castle Bravo was the first test of a Teller_Ulam configuration thermonuclear dry fuel hydrogen bomb, detonated at the Bikini Atoll on February 28, 1954. ...

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Dirty-bomb
http://www.strategic-air-command.com...bomb_chart.htm
http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/nuclear/multimeg.html
July 25th, 2005  
Italian Guy
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnigmaNZ
Say you want to create a 15-20 kiloton bomb, you can do this 3 ways. One is to build a fission bomb like the ones used on Japan in 1945, Fatman used 6kg of Plutonium and 260kg of Uranium, Little boy used 60kg of uranium. These are dirty bombs in that there is a lot of fallout from the explosion. Another way is to make a salted bomb, this is a fission bomb with a fusion shell desgned to produce the neutrons to ignite a outer uranium layer, or tamper. this also makes for a dirty bomb thanks to the large use of uranium. The third way is to use the smallest ammount of uranium or plutonium possible and use it as the igniter for a fusion outer shell. I think the smallest fission yield able to be used is about 0.3 kilotons, this is enough to fuse the lithium outer shell creating most of the yield, the fission core is the sparkplug. Around 2 kg of plutonium or about 6 kg of uranium is sufficient for this. This is referred to as a clean bomb as there is little fallout compared to the other types. By adding additional fusion stages the yield can be greatly increased without using more dirty trigger material. The w-80 warhead has yields from 0.3 kiloton using just the sparkplug, to 170 kt with the outer fusion stages.
Oh I see. Thank you Enigma- I never heard the bombs of Japan were actually dirty bombs, but I think I got you point. Very interesting. Sounds like different degrees-