D-Day questions, urgent!!!




 
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April 24th, 2005  
kathleen
 

Topic: D-Day questions, urgent!!!


Hi,
I'm translating a book on D-Day and I still have some questions.
At 9.30 a.m., Bradley received a telegram about the troupes at Easy Green, Easy Red and Fox Red. He was on board of the Augusta and I'm looking for the original English text.
Louis Lisko, does he speak English as mother tongue, I suppose, but I want to be sure.
At Omaha Beach, there was a fortified point that was destroyed, did the army attack at the back or at the side? The point is located in the hills of Vierville-sur-mer.
In the WN62, a fortified point of the German, there was a Flak to attack planes, but I want to know if it was used in both ways or directions. Can someone tell me more about it?
The brochure of the museum of Vierville tells there are some motos of parachutists, I didn't get the occasion to visit the museum, can someone send me a picture or explain me how it works?
Thanks a lot
Kathleen
April 24th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
What is the name of the book?

My uncle was a Major in the US Army. His battalion was in reserve on D-Day and landed on the morning of D+1. He watched the D-Day landing at Omaha from the deck of his troop ship, and his book has information about German guns that were causing problems for the landing teams, and how those guns were eliminated.
April 25th, 2005  
kathleen
 
It's a French book by Eddy Florentin: 'Guides des plages du débarquement et de la bataille de Normandie'. I'm translating the part on the american landing beaches, Omaha and Utah into Dutch.
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July 22nd, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
The American Rangers stormed some cliffs near Omaha Beach and took the gun positions after heavy casualties only to find that the Germans had already removed all the guns. Then there was the British Airborne assault on the Batteries at Bruneval, even though most of the men had been parachuted into the wrong area the attack went in with only 80 men and over half these were killed but the batteries were taken after some very bitter hand to hand fighting
August 19th, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
The American Rangers stormed some cliffs near Omaha Beach and took the gun positions after heavy casualties only to find that the Germans had already removed all the guns. Then there was the British Airborne assault on the Batteries at Bruneval, even though most of the men had been parachuted into the wrong area the attack went in with only 80 men and over half these were killed but the batteries were taken after some very bitter hand to hand fighting
Point Du Hoc.
August 19th, 2005  
Mike
 
Omar Bradley wrote an autobiography ("A Soldier's Story", perhaps?), The original text of the telegram *might* be in there.
August 25th, 2005  
FULLMETALJACKET
 
 
D-Day is my favorite thing to study, does anyone have titles of good books on D-day, ive checked online but i would like someone who's read it's input.
October 3rd, 2005  
The Cooler King
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FULLMETALJACKET
D-Day is my favorite thing to study, does anyone have titles of good books on D-day, ive checked online but i would like someone who's read it's input.
The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan is essential D-Day reading. It is a good place to start. Don't even bother with Stephen Ambrose's book on the subject.
October 3rd, 2005  
Missileer
 
 

Topic: Re: D-Day questions, urgent!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by kathleen
At Omaha Beach, there was a fortified point that was destroyed, did the army attack at the back or at the side? The point is located in the hills of Vierville-sur-mer.
In the WN62, a fortified point of the German, there was a Flak to attack planes, but I want to know if it was used in both ways or directions. Can someone tell me more about it?
The cliffs were attacked from the front and held by the Rangers until reinforcements from Omaha arrived. This took two days.

Pointe du Hoc (often misspelled as "Pointe du Hoe" in official Army documents) is best known for the assault made on it during the World War II Normandy landings, June 6, 1944. The Germans had fortified six 155-mm artillery emplacements on the cliffs which overlooked the landing beaches. These guns would enable artillery fire to be directed over both Omaha and Utah approaches, undoubtedly causing massive casualties in the landing forces. Although bombarded several times from the air and by naval guns, intelligence reports assumed that the fortifications were too strong, and would also require attack by ground forces. The US 2nd Ranger battallion was therefore given the task of destroying the strongpoint early on D-Day.
The plan called for the three companies of Rangers to be landed by sea at the foot of the cliffs, scale them using ropes, ladders, and grapples under enemy fire, and engage the enemy at the top of the cliff. This was to be carried out before the main landings.
The Rangers regrouped at the top of the cliffs, and a few went off in search of the guns, tracking them down far inland and destroying them. This new battery location inland was sighted solely for Utah beach.
October 3rd, 2005  
The Cooler King
 
The French Resistance warned the Allies several times that the guns had
not yet been installed at Pointe Du Hoc. They were still en route, two miles away from the positions. Makes you wonder how many Rangers could have been saved on D-Day.