Could UK defeat Germany without help from the United States?




View Poll Results :Could UK alone defeat Germany in WW2?
Yes 9 31.03%
No 20 68.97%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

 
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August 3rd, 2004  
SAINT
 

Topic: Could UK defeat Germany without help from the United States?


I wonder if Great Britain alone could defeat Germany without help from the United States during WW2? any analysis please?
August 3rd, 2004  
silent driller
 
 
I say yes to an extent. France got overrun, but Great Britain's Air Force was kicking 's ass. The US simply gave them the supplies to do it. Then there was DDay...
August 3rd, 2004  
yurry
 
I'd say yes but they would still have to buy weapons from the USA and the Russians would overrun most of Europe. If it werent for the Americans Churchill would probably invade the Balkans.

THE WAR WOULD BE MUUUCH LONGER THAN HISTORICALY

Uless the Germans managed to produce a superweapon of their own
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August 3rd, 2004  
Shadowalker
 
 
I would say yes but only if germany had managed to beat the russians! The german defeat in russia lost them a lot of men and equipment and they got another enemy pushing down on them, but if the russians had lost then the german would be free to use the whole luftwaffe against britain and they would have the time to build an invasion fleet and with the majority of europe under there control they would of had the resources to evenually beat the british as they would of (like they almost did) isolate britain through the use of U-boats!
August 3rd, 2004  
Uncle_Sam
 
 
SH**T I VOTED YES!
I MEANT NO!!!!!!
August 3rd, 2004  
David Hurlbert
 
I agree with Uncle_Sam. Furthermore, to think that the United Kingdom could have defeated Germany alone is not only a highly improbable hypothesis, but also one that is ridiculous. Without American intervention or assistance, Nazis flags might be decorating the city of London today. If you think about this question, the United Kingdom did fight the German alone [at least initially] and with very little success. To illustrate this fact, let’s just examine the state of affairs before America entered the conflict. And if we do this, we will have our answer – “NO WAY!” Let’s visit the summer of 1940. At that time, Hitler dominated Europe from the North Cape to the Pyrenees. His one remaining active enemy—Britain, under a new prime minister, Winston Churchill—vowed to continue fighting. The British army had left most of its weapons on the beaches at Dunker. Stalin was in no mood to challenge Hitler. The U.S., shocked by the fall of France, began the first peacetime conscription in its history and greatly increased its military budget, but public opinion, although sympathetic to Britain, was against getting into the war. The Germans hoped to subdue the British by starving them out. In June 1940 they undertook the Battle of the Atlantic, using submarine warfare to cut the British overseas lifelines. The Germans now had submarine bases in Norway and France. At the outset the Germans had only 28 submarines, but more were being built—enough to keep Britain in danger until the American entered the war to carry on the battle for months thereafter. Invasion was the expeditious way to finish off Britain, but that meant crossing the English Channel; Hitler would not risk it unless the British air force could be neutralized first. As a result, the Battle of Britain was fought in the air, not on the beaches. In August 1940 the Germans launched daylight raids against ports and airfields and in September against inland cities. The objective was to draw out the British fighters and destroy them. The Germans failed to reckon with a new device, radar, which greatly increased the British fighters' effectiveness. Because their own losses were too high the Germans had to switch to night bombing at the end of September. Between then and May 1941 they made 71 major raids on London and 56 on other cities, but the damage they wrought was too indiscriminate to be militarily decisive. On September 17, 1940, Hitler postponed the invasion indefinitely since the British were really in no position to invade Germany, thereby conceding defeat in the Battle of Britain. However, conceding defeat in this manner certainly did not make the British victorious. In short Great Britain declared war on Germany following the latter's invasion of Poland in 1939. After withdrawing her expeditionary force from France in June 1940, she continued the war on other fronts, chiefly by the long-drawn-out Battle of the Atlantic against the German submarine menace and the seesaw battles against the German Afrika Corps in the Western Desert of North Africa making little significant strategic inroads. It was not until the joint Anglo-American invasions of Italy and the final D-Day invasion of Nazi-held Europe that the Third Reich started to crumble.
August 3rd, 2004  
IrishWizard
 
What site you get that from?
August 3rd, 2004  
David Hurlbert
 
lol
August 4th, 2004  
Paddster
 
Good read dh76513, but, The Battle of Stalingrad and the entire Eastern Front had nothing to do with the reich crumbling? By the time D-Day came around the Germans were already beaten, we just dusted them off

We'll never really know what would have happened, but, being British, I believe we WOULD have fought fantacially for every inch of land, but yes, it would have took years for us to invade Germany.

Let us not forget that The Australians, New Zealanders, Canadians and South Africans were already in the War at the time.

Heres a question: in 1945, could the U.S.A have beat the U.S.S.R?
August 4th, 2004  
David Hurlbert
 
Paddster, Thank you for your kind words. Correct, but without the large number of American planes, trucks, and tanks sent to the Soviet Union would there have even been a Stalingrad? Then again without the large number of Russian military losses (I think about 9 million and more than all the other countries added together) would there even be a United States or Great Britain? These are all important factors to consider and you are correct in your conclusion that no one could possibly ever know the outcome to such a really. On that note, I would also like to add that I do not think United States could have done this alone either. While a Nazis invasion of the United States would have been unlikely for many years to come, we too would have fought like hell for every inch of land. And in addition to the allies you noted, let’s not forget all the other many countries that committed their warriors, resources, and efforts to stop Fascism. The bottom line is that the reality of this situation and the positive outcome in defeating Fascism required a collective world effort.