Combat Medic Question - Page 2




 
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July 5th, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
No Marines never fight with the Doc"s. They can lose your shot record!

But yes Navy Corpsman are assigned to Marine Units. The Marine Corps has no Medical MOS's.
July 13th, 2005  
AJChenMPH
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCane
Also dose anyone know of any links to info about Navy Coremen (SP) or whatever there called. They are like medics but dont they fight with the Marines?
Here's a site I just found after searching for "navy corpsman" on Yahoo: www.corpsman.com

A Navy corpsman is basically the same thing as the Army's 91W. They run the gamut from being an EMT-like support personnel on an aircraft carrier, to being the sole medical provider for a Marine combat unit (maybe at the platoon level?), to being a nurse practitioner/physician assistant-type person.

I found this, which seems to epitomize what a Navy corpsman is (excuse the spelling errors, but I didn't bother to correct the typos):

Quote:
I AM A NAVY CORPSMAN

I AM A NAVY CORPSMAN. I POSSESS THE STAMINA AND ENTHUSIAM OF YOUTH AND THE WISDOM AND EXPERINCE OF AN OLD MAN.

I AM 3 PARTS DOCTOR, 1 PART NURSE, 2 PARTS MARINE, 1 PART YEOMAN AND 3 PARTS MOM, YET I AM 100% SAILOR.

I AM UNEMPLOYABLE TO THE CIVILIAN WORLD IN MY GIVEN PROFESSION YET HAVE BEEN THE VERY LIFE LINE FOR COUNTLESS MARINES, SOLDIERS AND SAILORS SINCE 1778.

I HAVE CARRIED MARINES FROM THE BATTLE FIELD … AND HAVE BEN CARRIED REVERENTLY MYSELF BY MARINES WHO MORNED MY PASSING LIKE THAT OF A BROTHER OR SISTER.

I AM YOUNG. I AM OLD. BRAVE, SCARED AND SCARRED. MY TITLE HAS CHANGED OVER THE YEARS: LOBLOLLY BOY, SURGENS STEWART, PHARMICIST MATE, HOSPITAL CORPSMAN, IDC, YET WITH ALL THE CHANGES I AM STILL SIMPLY KNOW AS “DOC”.

I HAVE CELEBRATED PEACE; YET FELT THE STING OF WAR ON THE SEAS, IN JUNGLES, IN FOREIGN CITIES, IN WASHINGTON D.C. AND ON BEACHES OF EVERY SHADE OF SAND… WHITE, TAN, CORAL AND BLACK.

I HAVE RAISED HELL ON LIBERTY; HOPE IN THE MIDST OF BATTLE …. AND OLD GLORY ON IWO JIMA.

I HAVE REMOVED APPENDIXES ON SUBMARINES AND LIMBS IN THE MIDST OF BATTLE AND MANY OTHER PROCEDURES FAR ABOVE AND BEYOND WHAT I AM EXPECTED TO DO BY THE NORMAL PRACTICE OF MEDICINE BECAUSE IT HAD TO BE DONE IN ORDER TO SAVE THE LIFE OF A MARINE OR SAILOR IN BATTLE OR UNDER THE ICE, FAR FROM A DOCTORS CARE.

I HAVE IGNORED MY OWN WOUNDS TO THE POINT OF DEATH IN ORDER TO STAY AT MY STATION TREATING THE WOUNDED OF MY NATIONS NAVY, MARINE CORP, ARMY AND AIRFORCE.

I HAVE THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF MEDAL OF HONORS OF ANY CORP IN THE NAVY ….. MOST OF THEM PRESENTED TO MY WIFE, CHILD OR MOTHER BECAUSE I WAS ALREADY IN HEAVEN AT THE TIME.

I AM PROUD TO KNOW IN MY HEART THAT EVERY MARINE WHO HAS EVER FOUGHT AND EVERY SAILOR WHO HAS GONE TO SEA ON SHIPS OWE THEIR VERY LIVES TO THOSE THEY SIMPLY, YET RESPECTFULLY KNOW AS “DOC”

HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY TO ALL MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS.

MARK A. WRIGHT
HMC(SS), USN
14 FEBRUARY 2003

http://www.goatlocker.org/corpsman.htm
Speaking of advanced practices, here's an article I also came across:

Quote:
Headline: Independent duty corpsmen: medical jacks of all trades
By Judith Robertson, Naval Hospital Bremerton

BREMERTON, Wash. -- If you say they are the Jacks of all trades, you are close to the truth and they are proud of it. They work on small ships, subs, remote field operations and Medical Civil Action Programs. They are the front-line medical care for anything -- as trivial as a splinter, as serious as a heart attack.

They are independent duty corpsmen, or more familiarly, IDC, and as their name implies, they work alone. They are mature, professional, caring and dedicated individuals respected by their patients who just call them ‘doc.’

Thirty-eight IDC participated in the 7th Annual Pacific Northwest IDC conference Apr. 26-28 at Submarine Base Bangor, Wash. Sponsored by Naval Hospital Bremerton, the conference was designed to provide 16 continuing medical education credits necessary for IDC to remain current with medical updates, labs on airway management and the current medical treatment guidelines for Fleet IDC.

Aside from the "Professional Development of the IDC" segment, the agenda for the three-day conference read like a medical journal, covering such disparate subjects as "Anti-histamines and Allergies," "Pitfalls in Treating Abdominal Pain in Females," "Eye Trauma," and “Urological Emergencies." It was these billings that drew IDC from as far away as Washington, D.C., Millington, Tenn., and San Diego, Calif.

IDC detailers attended the conference, and according to Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman (SS/FMF) Craig Kelley, IDC program manager at the hospital, the detailers were not only able to get a good feel for the issues of the IDC they serve, but could also take advantage of the educational offerings.

"IDC detailers still need to keep their CME current. So it was a working visit," Kelley said. "We are providing professional education in primary and emergency care; it is the most important thing for an IDC."

For Chief Hospital Corpsman (FMF) Frank Percy, who works at the Fire Fighting Division, Fleet Training School, San Diego, Calif., this venue for getting CME credits is "the best," because it provided the opportunity to talk to specialists in the field.

"Normally, all my questions go to a general practitioner, which is usually no problem, but if you have a detailed question about the eye that's been bothering you, here's where you can get it answered by an eye specialist. Psychiatry is another specialty area where contact with a specialist is a benefit."

With an ever-increasing number of females in the Navy, Percy found the session on female abdominal pain the most valuable. While this particular subject might not be quite so foreign to Hospital Corpsman 1st Class (SW) Kathleen Michalski, the doc aboard USS Paul F. Foster (DD 964), the conference proved invaluable.

"The lectures are very appropriate for what we deal with day to day. It helps to answer questions that are always looming in the back of our heads. And the manual is excellent, very well organized."

IDC must first serve at least two years as a Hospital Corpsmen 2nd Class before they are eligible to attend the Navy's year-long Independent Corpsmen School. After graduation they are prepared to medically support all aspects of Navy and Marine Corps operations.

"Personally I feel they are indispensable, Kelley said.

Kelley had a real taste of just how indispensable when he went to a remote region in northern Vietnam last year in support of a State Dept. sponsored Medical Civil Action Program. "I was the sole care provider there. I saw more than 300 patients in four weeks: sick babies, aged women, malnutrition, broken bones, malaria, you name it. It was an area under served by medicine for years."

For Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Jerry Smith (DV/NAC), a diver medicine technician with the Submarine Development Group based at Bangor, the training helped in his aspirations to become an IDC.

"This is really good information. The more training, the better,” Smith said.

Aside from training, participants at the conference gained something more. "It provided a great opportunity to liaison with others in the field. Some have been in for awhile and have really good insight and experience," said Michalski, who is in her first year as an IDC.

Michalski and other conference attendees learned, among other valuable lessons, that while they work independently, they are not alone.

http://www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/...0/med00020.txt
July 14th, 2005  
MilidarUSMC
 
 
hey 03, i thought docs now cary around m16's and are no-longer non-combatants b/c the enemy has never cared who they were and they kept getting shot anyways.
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July 14th, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Don't know what the current TO&E is for Doc's but I know that some Doc's have always elected to carry M-16's. Especially in Infantry units and some other Units required their Doc's to carry Rifles.
July 19th, 2005  
782.matt
 
 
Here's some moto for any future Meds...

http://www.armytimes.com/story.php?f...925-976420.php
July 20th, 2005  
AJChenMPH
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 782.matt
Here's some moto for any future Meds...

http://www.armytimes.com/story.php?f...925-976420.php
Repost.

http://www.military-quotes.com/forum...ic.php?t=13443

BTW, here's an interesting clip from a report on an MP squad, callsign Raven 42:

Quote:
The Medic who fired the AT-4, said he remembered how from the week before when his squad leader forced him to train on it, though he didn't think as a medic he would ever use one. He said he chose to use it in that moment to protect the three wounded on the ground in front of him, once they came under fire from the building.
Apparently, they're from the 617th MP CO of the KY ARNG. Notwithstanding the fact that one of the team leaders is a female Sergeant, the MP squad does a heckuva job under intense insurgent/enemy fire in Iraq and comes out on top.

http://www.thedonovan.com/archives/003847.html
July 20th, 2005  
782.matt
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJChenMPH
Quote:
Originally Posted by 782.matt
Here's some moto for any future Meds...

http://www.armytimes.com/story.php?f...925-976420.php
Repost. :P

http://www.military-quotes.com/forum...ic.php?t=13443
Sorry, I only just decided yesterday to come back to the forums and I only check this one... 8)
July 20th, 2005  
AJChenMPH
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 782.matt
Sorry, I only just decided yesterday to come back to the forums and I only check this one... 8)
No worries, just giving ya a hard time. Then again, it's better than me posting this:



December 21st, 2005  
bulldogg
 
 
When I was in we were told that under the Geneva convention medics were considered non-combatants and that as such we were not allowed to carry a weapon BUT we could if we elected to, the result being we would lose our non-combatant status and be "fair game" which in reality we were anyway. The very reason for getting rid of the Medic Bullseye aka the Red Cross patch. Almost everyone decided we would carry a weapon. Even the two pacificists in my AIT class said they would if for no other reason than being able to defend their patient.
December 21st, 2005  
Chief Bones
 
 
I remember two young men that chose not to carry weapons on the battlefield. They were both Mormons that were drafted during the height of the Vietnam War and they carried the label "conscientious objector" with pride but still opted to serve the military as medics. I met them just a short while after reporting to my unit. They were serving with the First Cav. My unit had members of 1C that were tasked with maintaining the perimeter surrounding our transmitter/receiver site. While taking fire from the VC, I saw these same young men with bullets falling all around them dart out into no-man's land to retrieve soldiers who had fallen to incoming fire. Time and time again they placed their lives on the line so that others might live. I would like to say that they survived their service in Vietnam but that is just one of the nightmares that destroyed so many hours of my sleep. While trying to retrieve one of my best friends, both medics were killed by a salvo of incoming mortars.

I believe that both men were nominated for the Medal of Honor but I am not positive. I was transferred shortly after this tragedy and have lost contact with members of my unit that could have answered my questions.

IF YOU EVER DECIDE TO REALLY BECOME A BATTLEFIELD MEDIC YOU COULD NOT CHOOSE ANY BETTER EXAMPLES TO EMULATE.