Which was Churchill's biggest wartime blunder? - Page 5




 
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January 6th, 2007  
senojekips
 
 
Politics (and absolute necessity), makes for strange bedfellows.

The fact that they worked together against a common enemy doesn't mean that Winnie trusted Stalin, (or vice versa).
March 2nd, 2007  
Lord Londonderry
 
So true. Winnie never trusted Joe.
March 18th, 2007  
Young Winston
 
 
Churchill was an amazing man, even after considering his faults.
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March 26th, 2007  
sven hassell
 
 
The sinking of The Prince of Wales and The Repulse.Churchill still believed in the supremacy of big battleships over that of aircraft carriers.
May 25th, 2007  
Strongbow
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sven hassell
The sinking of The Prince of Wales and The Repulse.Churchill still believed in the supremacy of big battleships over that of aircraft carriers.
Yes, it was a terrible blow to Churchill.

It seems odd how the Australians were regularly being sucked into Churchills blunders.
June 5th, 2007  
Del Boy
 
GALLIPOLI
June 5th, 2007  
mmarsh
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sven hassell
The sinking of The Prince of Wales and The Repulse.Churchill still believed in the supremacy of big battleships over that of aircraft carriers.
It wasn't that Churchill didn't believe in Airpower, the Battle of Britain and the Battle of the Atlantic proved how powerful airplanes were.

Churchill's mistake was the same as the Americans at Pearl Harbor, he severely underestimated the capability of the Japanese Naval Air Corps, in this case the incredible range of the Mitsubishi G4M.
June 8th, 2007  
perseus
 
 
I agree that Churchill and the Admiralty still underestimated air power, but it was intended to send the carrier Indomitable, the only such ship available after the Ark Royal had been sunk, but she had run aground in Jamaica.

The other problem was that the rush to send the capital ships to Singapore meant there would not be a large destroyer screen, essential to protect large ships from air attack.

The commander of force Z Phillips was not experienced in the role of aircraft at sea and did not make full use of the fighter aircraft available, as antiquated these were. As soon as fighters appeared in the sky the Japanese aircraft soon cleared off but by then it was too late and the damage was done.
June 8th, 2007  
MontyB
 
 
Well here is something a little different I think one of his bigger screw ups was ordering a halt to operation Compass and diverting troops from the desert army to the Greek campaign before they captured Tripoli and drove the Italians from the African theatre thus ensuring a foothold for the Afrika Korps and a further 2 years of fighting.
June 8th, 2007  
perseus
 
 
Yes, there is no doubt Churchill is to blame for this, the record makes it clear that just as in the case of Norway, Churchill urged this strategic choice in defiance of the military view. Wavell, Cunningham and Longmore stressed the weakness of resources in terms of existing or projected tasks. Churchill also seemed to ignore the latest ultra intelligence on German strength. Churchill chose Greece for political reasons and perhaps his pet idea of a Balkan front .

However what is less widely known is that he later Churchill had second doubts about this and signalled Cairo do not consider yourselves obliged to a Greek enterprise if it is to be another Norwegian fiasco. However Wavell now expressed the opinion that there were a fair chance of stopping the Germans, although the chiefs of staff still disagreed.