Which was Churchill's biggest wartime blunder? - Page 4




 
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April 26th, 2006  
Stanford Tuck
 
It's Bollocks that the RN guns were unable to elevate to reach to coastal forts, also they were able to out range them. On October 29 1914 Groben and Breslau two German warships transfered to Turkish control, bombarded the Russian black sea forts of Odessa, Nikolaev and sevastipol. The british had issued an ultimatum to the Turks, ordering them to to dismiss the German military and naval missions to constantinopal and remove all German personal from the two German warships Goeben and Breslau. At noon on october 31 the ultimatum expired. Two day's later Churchill as first lord of the Admiralty , having obtained the first sea lords (jack Fishers ) approval, signaled vice-Admiral Carden to bombard the outer fort at Sedd-el-Bahar. The bombardment lasted ten minutes and destroyed almost all the heavy guns, the damage was never repaired.
The bombardment was not target practice and it was in response to Turkish aggression against an ally.
Reference material. Churchill A Life by Martin Gilbert.
Cheers
ST
May 19th, 2006  
bush musketeer
 
 

Topic: dardenells or crete


either the dardenells or crete would be do really. some of the commanders in the gallipoli campaign had fought against the zulus and didnot improve much when gallipoli was fought to the way they fought the zulus. the planning for that campagin was bloody pathetic. they did well to gain as much ground there as they did.
May 19th, 2006  
Stanford Tuck
 
Churchill can hardly be blamed for the on ground carrying out of the Dardenells campaign. During the naval phase the ships comanders were still in a peace time mentality of not wanting to risk ships for an objective ( at times they were close to clearing the mine fields). Once it became a combined Army Navy campaign he had little to do with it.
The initial idea of taking the Dardenelles and Constantinople were his, and was one of the few far sighted ideas of the Great War.
I am not home at the moment and don't have access to my reference material but I suggest checking Martin Gilbert official biography and William Manchester, The Last Lion.
Cheers
ST
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September 1st, 2006  
Young Winston
 
 
Churchill certainly paid for it later.
September 13th, 2006  
LeEnfield
 
 
It was Churdhills idea and he carried the can for the poor planning, but give Churchill credit he put on a uniform and went and fought in the trenches on the Westren Front.
January 5th, 2007  
Young Winston
 
 
Yes, he had guts.
January 5th, 2007  
perseus
 
 
His main faults were having an overoptimistic view of the situation and a failure to listen to his commanders, this was a reoccurring theme throughout his career.

In view of his strategic vision of the Dardanelles campaign and his lack of responsibility (or should that be attention) for detail, it's a toss up between Singapore, the Greek campaign and his related obsession with the Balkans in WW2.

In Singapore, he paid for years of empty rhetoric and treasury cutbacks including when he was exchequer. This compelled him to place large numbers of untrained troops in Malaysia and defend them with Capital Ships without air support.

In Greece it was another case of overoptimism and empty support for an ally. Rather than diverting troops to Greece, he could have cleared North Africa before Germany could provide support for the Italians. Large resources from Britain and America were subsequently poured into the Mediterranean theater which should have gone into NW Europe.
January 5th, 2007  
senojekips
 
 
I'm no great fan of the man, however, I think he did the best that he could with what was available at the time. I can't think of another leader in England who I can say would have probably done better given the circumstances.

Everyone has 20/20 vision in hindsight.
January 5th, 2007  
Gator
 
 
Back when I was in EOD School, we learned about how the Brits, starting the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Field out of necessity (owing to the fact that there were all those German Bombs laying around) were kicking butt on a German Bomb fuze. So, to help boost morale, the British Government had it published in the paper how British Bomb Techs were winning their end of the Blitz.
But, the Brits failed to take into account that the Germans were also reading the British News Papers and such, and so the Germans simply changed how the Fuze worked coming out. In the end England lost a lot of good Techs over that mishap.
I do not believe there is any way of knowing if it was up to Churchill to run that story to help lift the spirits of the British during the Blitz or not, but that's how I heard it anyway.

In my own opinion, Churchill was the right man at the right moment of human history.
January 5th, 2007  
perseus
 
 
There is no doubt that Churchill had many attributes, at least as a figurehead, but he also strongly influenced British and Allied policy sometimes down to the detail of individual actions. The question is what was his biggest wartime blunder? There are many to choose from, starting from the Norwegian Campaign, to trusting in Stalin.