chinese development, love or fear??? - Page 2




 
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Boots
 
March 10th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
well, it seems that today's chinese leaders are pretty good at their job.

with thousands of bureaucrats and such, china has the largest government body in teh world, so the number of advisers are definetly large.

with advisers and bureacrats giving advices, the leader has a pretty good prospective about things.

about the car comment: ya, china is trying to control the nubmer of car owners, but we cant do that very well because everyone has teh right to buy a car, and we cant go and bash ppl and steal their cars

apparently over the year 2003 the number of private vehicles doubled.


well, apparently china has the second most highways in the world, besides the us interstate system, but quickly catching up
March 10th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
heres some more development pics, and some highway pics:



March 10th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
i guess that didnt work out, heres the update







[img=http://img146.exs.cx/img146/5281/gaoshu0323gr.th.jpg]









--
Boots
March 10th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
In 2001, the total line lenght of China Railways exceeded 70.000 km. 23.000 km were double tracked and 17.000 km electrified. China Railways is the thrid longest railway in the world, and in double tracked and electrified lines it is number 1 in Asia.

http://home.c2i.net/schaefer/chinara...tatistics.html


China is investing billions of dollars into world-class highways. Smoothly paved roads connect major cities with inland neighbors, such as Jixi City, seen above.

A well-kept secret: China's quality highways

By Michael Dunne / Autos Insider
Michael Dunne
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Michael Dunne / Autos Insider

Downtown Jining City: New highways are accelerating broader economic development and reducing transport times.
Image
Michael Dunne / Autos Insider

Improved roads allow foreign companies to set up operations off the coast, in locations such as Handan City, above, instead of more expensive venues.

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SHANGHAI -- When it comes to infrastructure, China always thinks big.

Look no further than the Great Wall, Tiananmen Square or giant man-made canals to appreciate the nation's proclivity for massive public works.

Today, China's number one public works project is building new roads. First-time visitors find themselves awestruck by the quality and expanse of the fresh pavement.

Last month a delegation from Detroit-based auto parts companies traveled to some budding manufacturing centers outside Shanghai. On the night before their return home, I asked what impressed them most about their first visit to China.

"The roads," they replied. "Before coming over, we said okay, it's great to sell two million new cars. But where are they going to run them - over rice fields? Now we know that China has the highways."

Taking a cue from America's own economic miracle, China is investing billions of dollars into world-class highways. Smoothly paved roads - some as wide as eight lanes - connect major cities like Shanghai with its inland neighbors.

Heavy trucks, laden with gravel for construction sites, snake along at speeds of less than 50 mph. In the passing lane, you see BMWs, Buick Regals and Honda Accords routinely blowing by at speeds of 80 or 90 mph.

Just beginning to surface are full service rest stops, which appear strikingly similar in scale and layout to what we have in America. Giant signs in Chinese and English indicate mileage to next cities, exits and highway interchanges.

New highways are clearly accelerating broader economic development. Transport times between Anhui (where annual incomes average as little as $300) and Shanghai have been reduced from days to hours.

But the roads also have produced some staggering costs in terms of human lives. In 2003, some 115,000 people were killed on Chinese roads. This death total compares with a level of around 46,000 in America.

The speed limit is 110 kilometers (68 miles) per hour. But because the roads have sprung up so rapidly, local governments do not have the resources to police them.

Half of the casualties are pedestrians, mostly in the rural areas. New highways often run straight through a farmer's land. Unfamiliar with vehicle speeds, farmers misjudge how much time is needed to scamper safely across the road. Bicyclists, who share roads with cars, are also frequent victims.

Whatever the costs, China seems undeterred in its quest to show the world that it can match global infrastructure standards.

In 2004 the city of Shanghai invested $1.2 billion in a world-class facility to host China's first Formula One race. Top engineers from Audi who had test driven vehicles at Shanghai circuit say the track quality is as good or better than anywhere else in the world.

Improved roads are good news for overseas investors too. Now, it is possible to for foreign companies set up operations off the coast instead of in the more expensive Shanghai venues.

As for the Chinese, it seems that they embrace the new highways despite the heavy casualties. When asked about the national death toll, a young Shanghai professional answered with shrug of resignation: "Well, there are just too many people in China. And we need the roads."

Image
Michael Dunne / Autos Insider

Because roads have sprung up so rapidly, local governments do not have the resources to police them. In 2003, some 115,000 people were killed on Chinese roads like those seen here in Baoding City.


http://www.detnews.com/2004/insiders...ders-45847.htm


http://www.chinapage.com/road/road.html


February 07, 2002

China Claims 19,000 km Highway, Next Only to the US
China's infrastructure construction has been developing rapidly. By the end of last year, the nation's total length of highway had reached 19,000 kilometers which, for the first time surpassed that of Canada and turning China into the world second biggest country in terms of highway mileage, next only to the US.

Thanks to more scientifically designed and exercised Macro-economic policies last year, China had reduced the impact of world economic slowdown to the minimum yet still ensured a growth rate of 7.3 percent.

The infrastructure construction has been developing rapidly. By the end of last year, China's total length of highway had reached 19,000 kilometers which, for the first time surpassed that of Canada and turning China into the world second biggest country in terms of highway mileage, next only to the US.

As for consumption policy, last year saw the state raise salary twice, both by 30 percent, which benefited 80 million people, and the dispensable income for urban dwellers had reached RMB 6,860 yuan per capita.

Besides, the state's control on monetary and fiscal policies also turned out effective. The interest rate was in a cut for 8 successive years beginning from 1996, and from 1998 additional treasury bonds have been issued for four times, which has brought stimulus to short-term investing and long-term economy and helped to promote construction in transportation, communication sectors and city functions.



China Ranks World's Second in Expressway Construction
China has completed constructing over 3,000 kilometers of new expressways last year, thereby increasing its mileage of accessible expressways to 19,000 kilometers, leaping second of the world.

Construction of expressway will maintain a rapid growth in the country in the coming period of time. A national mainline network composed of "five vertical and seven horizontal" throughways will be completed and become accessible in 2008 when the Olympic Games is to be held in Beijing. (In Detail)

http://english.people.com.cn/200202/...07_90114.shtml



China Ranks World's Second in Expressway Construction
China has completed constructing over 3,000 kilometers of new expressways this year, thereby increasing its mileage of accessible expressways to 19,000 kilometers, leaping second of the world. Construction of expressway will maintain a rapid growth in the country in the coming period of time. A national mainline network composed of "five vertical and seven horizontal" throughways will be completed and become accessible in 2008 when the Olympic Games is to be held in Beijing.


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New Record Set
Sources say that China has created a highlight by setting a news record on newly added mileage this year. The highest record was 2,872 kilometers in 2000.

# Lianyungang-Horgos Highway


On the trunk line of Lianyungang-Horgos National Highway, expressways that connect Luoyang, Sanmenxia with Lingbao, and Shangqiu with Kaifeng have become accessible.

# Beijing-Zhuhai Highway


On the trunk line of Beijing-Zhuhai National Highway, sections in Hunan Province and Hubei Province, covering more than 100 and 220 kilometers respectively, have been completed.

# Southwest Expressway


On Beijing-Fuzhou National Highway, Hefei-Xuzhou section has been finished; the 1015-km exit channel of the Southwest Expressway, which has been completed recently, provided a convenient means to the impoverished southwest regions to touch the world.

Expressway construction develops quickly in China since the country started its first project in 1988. By the end of 1998, the total mileage of accessible expressways had reached 6,258 kilometers, leaping eighth of the world; by the end of 1999, the total mileage reached 10,000 kilometers, ranking fourth; and by the end of 2000, 16,000 kilometers, the third.

Rapid Growth to Be Maintained
# Two Vertical, Two Horizontal
Construction of expressway will maintain a rapid growth in the country in the coming period of time. "Three Important Sections composed of two vertical and two horizontal highways", China's first national highway network which takes expressway as mainlines, will be completed in 2002.

# Five Vertical, Seven Horizontal


So far, sections of Beijing-Shenyang and Beijing-Shanghai have become accessible. Sections jointing Tongjiang in Heilongjiang Province with Sanya in Hainan Province, Beijing with Zhuhai, Lianyungang with Horgos, Shanghai with Chengdu, and the section of exit channel of southeast regions are under intense construction.

A national mainline network composed of "five vertical and seven horizontal" throughways will be completed and become accessible in 2008 when the Olympic Games is to be held in Beijing.



China Invests Heavily in Highways
China Invests Heavily in Highways in 2001. A total investment of 220 billion yuan (some US$26.6 billion) is expected to be made in high construction for the whole of this year. Highway investment in the vast western areas in January-October increased by 17 percent on an annual basis. A sum of 172.6 billion yuan (US$20.9 billion) was invested in highway projects in China in the first ten months this year.

By the end of this year, the total length of highways in China is estimated to reach 1.4 million kilometers, including 16,000 kilometers of expressways.

China's First Desert Expressway Under Construction
Construction of China's first desert expressway is well under way and scheduled to be completed in 2003. The expressway stretches from Yulin City to Jingbian County in northwest China's Shaanxi Province, cutting across the 10,000- square-kilometer Mu Us Desert, on the border of Shaanxi Province and the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

The 134-kilometer expressway has 17 bridges, 30 overpasses and 200 culverts, and will be built at a cost of 1.76 billion yuan.

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/20...17_86882.shtml




http://s3.invisionfree.com/PLA_MILIT...?showtopic=105
March 10th, 2005  
chewie_nz
 



this is probably the best example of what i was talking about....exactly what china DOESN'T need!

gas guzzling US style SUV's
March 10th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
lol, i know what ur saying

but those costs dam alot and only ppl who are super rich can afford them, so no worry


cool suv eh?
March 10th, 2005  
chewie_nz
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mech
lol, i know what ur saying

but those costs dam alot and only ppl who are super rich can afford them, so no worry


cool suv eh?
not really...i hate the Civvy hummer with a vengance. automative ******y in my opinion. if you're going to have an off road vehicle....drive it off road ( and make sure it has the abilitie to do it!)
March 11th, 2005  
Boobies
 
 

Topic: Well,


I hope China has or going to havesome strict policies about air polution. Those frealkin huge SUVs are NASTY to the environment. Can you imagine Chinese people, all or lot of them are driving gas-hog SUVs?

I think the Ozone Layer goona cry soon.
March 11th, 2005  
chewie_nz
 

Topic: Re: Well,


Quote:
Originally Posted by Boobies

I think the Ozone Layer goona cry soon.
already is....i live in the southern part of NZ (ie close to the Ozone hole)

you can get burnt on a cloudy day etc etc
March 11th, 2005  
Snauhi
 

Topic: Re: Well,


Quote:
Originally Posted by chewie_nz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boobies

I think the Ozone Layer goona cry soon.
already is....i live in the southern part of NZ (ie close to the Ozone hole)

you can get burnt on a cloudy day etc etc

-20 celsius here=-4 degrees Fahrenheit