China WILL rule the world. - Page 4




 
--
 
October 21st, 2011  
ezlead
 
The only way China will rule the world is if they buy it. Their economy is growing so fast that they can't control it. As the Soviet Union has shown,Communism is only good for bankrupting countries. China is closer to capitalism than they ever were. Their biggest problem now, is their own citizens want a bigger share of the money.
They don't want to fight us. We are their biggest customer. We owe them several trillion dollars to boot. If they start something,we just embargo everything from there(sorry WalMart). We also tell them that all debts are off. You Lose!
October 22nd, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ezlead
The only way China will rule the world is if they buy it.
Absolutely, the South African government is getting nice and cozy with the Chinese, hoping they will invest big bucks.
October 22nd, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
Wheel goes round and round, at one time it took a few hundred years for things to change now you can watch it change in ones life time.
--
October 23rd, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Wheel goes round and round, at one time it took a few hundred years for things to change now you can watch it change in ones life time.
What makes me wonder, what do the Chinese want in return?

The gold and diamond companies are privately owned, which gives reason as to why the ANC want to Nationalize the gold mines and the diamond companies. That is possibly why the Chinese are interested.

I suspect that the Chinese invested heavily in Malta after the British left, to gain a foothold in the Mediterranean Sea.
October 23rd, 2011  
bulldogg
 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ezlead
They don't want to fight us. We are their biggest customer. We owe them several trillion dollars to boot. If they start something,we just embargo everything from there(sorry WalMart). We also tell them that all debts are off. You Lose!
The US is a debtor nation, China wins. The Chinese are the single largest holder of American debt, they can bankrupt the US while it sleeps. The US did it to the UK in 1953, read up on it. It took the UK 30 years to recover (and then Thatcher screwed her own country).

Read much about post war inflation in losing countries? THAT is the scenario the US faces bru.

China has the single largest slush fund of foreign currency to invest wherever they want. They are buying countries, buying companies, getting their enemies in debt to them. They have 1.3 billion people and dont believe all the bs the American media spew about how poor they all are. I have lived here for a decade and I can tell you once again the media and journalists are full of sh!te. C'mon, your profile says you've been there done that so you know the journos don't tell the truth. Why believe them now? The Chinese have 1 billion more consumers than there are men, women and children in the US, who incidentally have the highest rate of personal debt in the modern world, so they don't need the US, its the other way around.

I aint saying I like it. I don't. But you need to face reality. The US is a has been and China is the future.
October 23rd, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulldogg
How old are you? The US is a debtor nation, China wins. They are the single largest holder of American debt, they can bankrupt the US while it sleeps. The US did it to the UK in 1953, read up on it. It took the UK 30 years to recover (and then Thatcher screwed her own country).

Read much about post war inflation in losing countries? THAT is the scenario the US faces bru.

China has the single largest slush fund of foreign currency to invest wherever they want. They are buying countries, buying companies, getting their enemies in debt to them. They have 1.3 billion people and dont believe all the bs the American media spew about how poor they all are. I have lived here for a decade and I can tell you they are full of sh!te. They have 1 billion more consumers than there are men, women and children in the US, who incidentally have the highest rate of personal debt in the modern world.

An education and some perspective might be in order.

I aint saying I like it. I don't. But you need to face reality. The US is a has been and China is the future.
Correction : China is the single largest holder of foreign US debt. China owns 16% of the total US debt (US public has 68%). China isn't that strong (yet) in terms of economy. GDP is $5.9 trillion in 2010 The US and his allies, who certainly would come to the rescue, have $40,6 trillion. ($4 trillion of India not included). A trade war would be desastrous for the world, but China would be the biggest loser. China does have the potential to become the new superpower of the world, but for the moment it has to many weak spots. Also, do not forget the massive debt the Chinese local-government entities have.
October 23rd, 2011  
Yossarian
 
 
In a world where the United States and China suddenly for whatever purpose or design attempt to out match each other via economic means would as mentined here before be of dire consequence.

China and the United States are very very co dependent on each other via means of debt allocation and banking of each others currency, and that does not even begin to scratch material value of goods and products that China has sitting in ports and distrubution centers across the U.S.

Both countries have the potential to ruin finacially one another, but at this point in time, China I honestly believe does not have the capability to survive while holding it's current aspirations without the revenue and business the U.S. is willing to provide for them.

And both adversaries would be left in very similar economiclly depressed states.
November 14th, 2011  
Seehund
 

Topic: Eurozone Debt Crisis Reveals China's Economic Weakness


The Chinese continue to watch the way in which the Europeans are trying to deal with their financial and political crisis right now. For China this is particularly important. Number one, Europe has become Chinaís largest export market and that has a major impact, of course, on the way in which the Chinese operate their economy. Number two is that a continued or an even deeper crisis in Europe could pull the entire global economy into recession.

Chinese exports to Europe and to much of the rest of the world saw a particularly sharp drop in 2009. This was something that the Chinese government had to rush to stabilize ó they counteracted that dip in exports with a huge increase in domestic investment. The Chinese had hoped, during that time, that the Europeans would simply build themselves back up, pull themselves out of this particular crisis and that China would be able to continue with its fairly rapid expansion of exports to Europe to keep its economy chugging along as China headed towards its 2012 leadership transition.

Although Chinese exports to Europe picked up a little bit in 2010, the rate of growth that the Chinese had been seeing in the previous four or five years slowed down quite a bit. The problem for China is that as the pace of export growth slows, the pace of import growth doesnít. The Chinese still need a very large amount of commodities. Theyíre importing these commodities, not only to feed their export market, but to feed all of this new domestic investment. And that means that while the Chinese may not be making as much selling, they are having to buy still a very high market prices to be able to develop internally.

The European crisis, and really the slowdown in the United States as well, has brought home to the Chinese something that they already knew but they had hoped to be postponing ó and that is the need to fundamentally restructure their economy. The Chinese base their economy very similar on what weíve seen in other Asian economies; it was an economy that needed continuous growth. Continuous growth in exports, more money, more money every year and that would allow the Chinese simply to borrow, to supply employment, to not have to worry about things like profits, but rather find some ways to funnel money down into the population.

If we look at the Chinese then we see that thereís maybe 300 million people who are part of the really economically active part of China. However, that leaves out more than a billion people from being part of this Chinese economic growth, this Chinese economic activity. Historically, itís not from the coastal areas, itís not from the wealthy areas that trouble comes in China. Itís from the rural areas, itís from the people who are poor, itís from the people who arenít connected to this economic system.

One of the solutions the Chinese have tried to follow is urbanization: the idea that if they build it, people will come and if people move to the cities they will suddenly have jobs and in having jobs in the cities and living in a city, theyíre going to become consumers. And certainly this is not for the entire billion of the population thatís not active, but maybe another hundred million, 200 million, 300 million. And that would help to better distribute wealth throughout China; it would also ease China off from their heavy dependence upon exports.

This boom in urbanization coincided with this government need to spend a lot more on domestic investment. It also fell right inside of what was already building as a speculative bubble in real estate investment. And that investment was coming not only from the coastal populations in China ó the ones who are trying to find ways to save for the future and therefore invest in real estate ó but also from businesses, from SOEs, who are buying real estate watching prices go up and then betting against that real estate, or investing or taking out loans against that real estate, to be able to continue to operate their businesses.

So we have a China thatís facing a real estate bubble in an attempt to build a new urbanized society, but the individuals who would be moving into that urbanized society canít afford to move in because of the price rise in housing. The government is trying to find ways to slow down that rise in price, but if they move too quickly it can undermine the collateral for the loans from state-owned enterprises, it can pull away the nest egg from their middle class and that can cause a very rapid backlash against the central government.

For China then, what this European crisis has done is it has brought something that theyíve known for a long time right up into the front. They no longer have the ability, it seems, to simply keep pushing back economic change and perhaps even not the ability push back political change in the country because the European crisis has ended their ability to count on this continuous rise in exports.
November 14th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seehund
The Chinese continue to watch the way in which the Europeans are trying to deal with their financial and political crisis right now. For China this is particularly important. Number one, Europe has become Chinaís largest export market and that has a major impact, of course, on the way in which the Chinese operate their economy. Number two is that a continued or an even deeper crisis in Europe could pull the entire global economy into recession.

Chinese exports to Europe and to much of the rest of the world saw a particularly sharp drop in 2009. This was something that the Chinese government had to rush to stabilize ó they counteracted that dip in exports with a huge increase in domestic investment. The Chinese had hoped, during that time, that the Europeans would simply build themselves back up, pull themselves out of this particular crisis and that China would be able to continue with its fairly rapid expansion of exports to Europe to keep its economy chugging along as China headed towards its 2012 leadership transition.

Although Chinese exports to Europe picked up a little bit in 2010, the rate of growth that the Chinese had been seeing in the previous four or five years slowed down quite a bit. The problem for China is that as the pace of export growth slows, the pace of import growth doesnít. The Chinese still need a very large amount of commodities. Theyíre importing these commodities, not only to feed their export market, but to feed all of this new domestic investment. And that means that while the Chinese may not be making as much selling, they are having to buy still a very high market prices to be able to develop internally.

The European crisis, and really the slowdown in the United States as well, has brought home to the Chinese something that they already knew but they had hoped to be postponing ó and that is the need to fundamentally restructure their economy. The Chinese base their economy very similar on what weíve seen in other Asian economies; it was an economy that needed continuous growth. Continuous growth in exports, more money, more money every year and that would allow the Chinese simply to borrow, to supply employment, to not have to worry about things like profits, but rather find some ways to funnel money down into the population.

If we look at the Chinese then we see that thereís maybe 300 million people who are part of the really economically active part of China. However, that leaves out more than a billion people from being part of this Chinese economic growth, this Chinese economic activity. Historically, itís not from the coastal areas, itís not from the wealthy areas that trouble comes in China. Itís from the rural areas, itís from the people who are poor, itís from the people who arenít connected to this economic system.

One of the solutions the Chinese have tried to follow is urbanization: the idea that if they build it, people will come and if people move to the cities they will suddenly have jobs and in having jobs in the cities and living in a city, theyíre going to become consumers. And certainly this is not for the entire billion of the population thatís not active, but maybe another hundred million, 200 million, 300 million. And that would help to better distribute wealth throughout China; it would also ease China off from their heavy dependence upon exports.

This boom in urbanization coincided with this government need to spend a lot more on domestic investment. It also fell right inside of what was already building as a speculative bubble in real estate investment. And that investment was coming not only from the coastal populations in China ó the ones who are trying to find ways to save for the future and therefore invest in real estate ó but also from businesses, from SOEs, who are buying real estate watching prices go up and then betting against that real estate, or investing or taking out loans against that real estate, to be able to continue to operate their businesses.

So we have a China thatís facing a real estate bubble in an attempt to build a new urbanized society, but the individuals who would be moving into that urbanized society canít afford to move in because of the price rise in housing. The government is trying to find ways to slow down that rise in price, but if they move too quickly it can undermine the collateral for the loans from state-owned enterprises, it can pull away the nest egg from their middle class and that can cause a very rapid backlash against the central government.

For China then, what this European crisis has done is it has brought something that theyíve known for a long time right up into the front. They no longer have the ability, it seems, to simply keep pushing back economic change and perhaps even not the ability push back political change in the country because the European crisis has ended their ability to count on this continuous rise in exports.
I think the fleeing (or trying to) of wealthy Chinese proofs your point.
January 7th, 2012  
samneanderthal
 
Japan dominated the world economy with minimal military spending (defensive in nature), because it didn't intend to start a war.
In contrast, Hitler did not mass produce vegetable oils, VWs, Mercedes, railroad engines, freighters or Condors in order to export them and grow economically (like Schacht, his economist wanted), but put his money on thousands of planes, tanks, the Bismarck, expensive synthetic fuel, etc, and attacked Europe in a few years.
China is both exporting unprecedented amounts of goods (like Japan did) and using much of its income to grow militarily (like Hitler did, but at a slower pace). No country that is not threatened would be foolish enough to spend fortunes expanding and modernizing rapidly its military for offensive operations if it does not intend to use it.
 


Similar Topics
Is United Kingdom a Superpower?
voices
India, China seek to resolve boundary dispute
China' army
Will China unite with Taiwan peacefully?