The Canadian Army - Page 7




 
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June 22nd, 2006  
Ronin
 
 
Haha, I think this post has dwindled down to uselessness.

Goes to show, anything relating to the Canadian Military loses all importance.

jk...
June 23rd, 2006  
CanadianCombat
 
 
Shows what u know
June 23rd, 2006  
Senior Chief
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomtom22
Ok..................
TomTom, you are no fun on Thursdays!!
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June 24th, 2006  
hammerlock
 
 
"If you have a problem with speaking English to people that visit your country then don't interact with those visitors. In Ontario most of the people speak both languages and when they work with Americans they speak English. I have made some pretty strong friendships with the guys I worked with in Ontario, BC, Nova Scotia, Alberta and in the Northwest Territory.

As for me learning French. Why? French isn't even a secondary language in the U.S, if I were going to study a second or third language it would be Spanish and maybe Farsi. I live and work mostly in the United States. It isn't the language that is the barrier, it's the outlandish arrogance of the people. When I say French Canadians I limit that to those that live in Quebec as it is the only province that I've ever had any language problem in. Like I said, if they couldn't speak English it would be more acceptable, but they refuse to speak it."

Senior Chief. You have a few mistakes here I was to correct for you. For one, most people In Ontario only speak english. Its taught as a core course until grade 9, and most lose what they know by their mid 20's. Canada is biligual in name only. The farther west you go the less french people know. Main reason to learn french in any prov but Quebec and NB is to get a better job with feberal government.
June 24th, 2006  
Senior Chief
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammerlock
"If you have a problem with speaking English to people that visit your country then don't interact with those visitors. In Ontario most of the people speak both languages and when they work with Americans they speak English. I have made some pretty strong friendships with the guys I worked with in Ontario, BC, Nova Scotia, Alberta and in the Northwest Territory.

As for me learning French. Why? French isn't even a secondary language in the U.S, if I were going to study a second or third language it would be Spanish and maybe Farsi. I live and work mostly in the United States. It isn't the language that is the barrier, it's the outlandish arrogance of the people. When I say French Canadians I limit that to those that live in Quebec as it is the only province that I've ever had any language problem in. Like I said, if they couldn't speak English it would be more acceptable, but they refuse to speak it."

Senior Chief. You have a few mistakes here I was to correct for you. For one, most people In Ontario only speak english. Its taught as a core course until grade 9, and most lose what they know by their mid 20's. Canada is biligual in name only. The farther west you go the less french people know. Main reason to learn french in any prov but Quebec and NB is to get a better job with feberal government.

I worked on four projects in Ontario. Hearst, Timmins Toronto and another city that was building a MDF Plant. Each and every time I used the phone the operator answered in French. Each and every restaurant I went to the waitresses spoke in French first and then switched to English. You might think you have corrected me, but you were not there and did not live through the transition period. The people were friendly and once they recognized me they always spoke English.
June 26th, 2006  
Pete031
 
 
Quebec is the only French Province, New Brunswick being the only Bi-lingual... In the Maritimes and in parts of Ontario, you have Acadian and French speakers.... Having said that, Canada is a Bi-lingual country, but Ontario is an English province....
June 26th, 2006  
Yoman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senior Chief
I worked on four projects in Ontario. Hearst, Timmins Toronto and another city that was building a MDF Plant. Each and every time I used the phone the operator answered in French. Each and every restaurant I went to the waitresses spoke in French first and then switched to English. You might think you have corrected me, but you were not there and did not live through the transition period. The people were friendly and once they recognized me they always spoke English.
You will almost NEVER see people first talk to you in French and then switch to English. You would be lucky if they spoke French in most cities. There are now about 4-5 people telling you that what you are saying is incorrect. When will you accept the fact that what you might have saw is not the norm?

I think its time to stop talking about talking about this, as tomtom sugegsted. If you want to proceed, I suggest creating a thread in another area of the forums.
June 26th, 2006  
RnderSafe
 
 
I suggest members stop acting like moderators and start using the report post feature.

I also suggest the country / military bashing stop.

Get back on topic immediately.

In case some of you haven't bothered to notice - we are not being shy with bans of late. Follow the rules.
June 26th, 2006  
Yoman
 
 
Quote:
Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor unveiled a plan Monday to purchase three new supply ships as part of a multi-billion-dollar investment in the Canadian military.

The total cost of the new 28,000-tonne ships, including an $800-million maintenance contract, is expected to be $2.9 billion.
http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...-spending.html

Quote:
Canada First at home and abroad – how we’ll meet needs moving forward
The Joint Support Ship will provide Canada with modern vessels that are a critical component of Canada’s defence capability, both at home and abroad. These vessels will enable the Canadian Forces to fulfill its domestic maritime security priorities as well as support Canada’s foreign policy objectives.
The Joint Support Ships will maintain the core capabilities inherent in the Navy’s current replenishment ships including:
  • The provision at sea of fuel, food, spare parts, and ammunition;
  • Modern medical and dental care facilities, including an operating room for urgently needed operations;
  • Repair facilities and technical expertise to keep aircraft and other equipment functioning; and
  • Basic self-defence.
They will also support Canadian Forces operations ashore through additional features, including:
  • Roll-on Roll-off (RO-RO) of cargo;
  • Lift-on Lift-off (LO-LO) of cargo;
  • The operation of three to four maritime helicopters (each ship);
  • Work and living space for additional personnel, over and above the standard crew of up to 165 people; and,
  • Capability to navigate in first-year arctic ice.
Replenishment ships such as the Joint Support Ship enable a Naval Task Group to remain at sea for up to six times longer than would be possible without these ships. This capability is critical to safeguard our domestic maritime security and sovereignty. With their added capacity to support troops ashore, they will also serve to reinforce Canada’s global presence while supporting our nation’s foreign policy objectives. Here are some highlights of what the Joint Support Ship will offer:
  • A covered multi-purpose deck space for vehicles and containers with space for additional containers on the upper decks. This will serve to reduce the reliance on chartered sealift.
  • The notional dimensions of the ship will be in the order of 200 metres in length, 26 metres in breadth and a displacement of 28,000 metric tonnes.
  • In addition to the interoperatibility with the Army and Air Force, being able to function as a Joint Task Force Headquarters is also important, as it may be impossible to establish a JTF HQ ashore in areas of conflict.
  • Inherent in the ship design will also be an ability to be rapidly reconfigured. The hangar, normally used for doing maintenance on aircraft, could be rapidly transformed to care for survivors of a disaster at sea or at shore.
  • The ship will also be configured with both active and passive self-defence systems and an ability to navigate in first-year arctic ice up to 0.7 metres thick.
A fair, open and transparent process
The four consortia bidding on the project definition phase are led by:
  • Irving Shipbuilding
  • BAE Systems (Project) Limited (BAE Systems Naval Ships)
  • ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems AG
  • SNC-Lavalin Profac Inc.
http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/newsroo..._e.asp?id=1958

Quote:
With a fleet of modernized and improved logistics trucks, fewer vehicles will be required to get the job done. The new fleet will enhance mission flexibility and global deployability by using standardized containers and palletized load-handling systems, allowing materials to be transferred easily among many modes of transportation. The vehicles will be the Army’s logistics backbone, getting supplies where they are needed in the most efficient way possible.
The project aims to procure approximately:
  • 1500 standard military pattern vehicles (designed specifically for military use) with up to 300 load-handling system companion trailers;
  • 800 commercial vehicles adapted for military use;
  • 1000 specially equipped vehicles kits (such as mobile kitchens, offices and medical or dental stations); and,
  • 300 armour protection systems.
The commercial vehicles will be used in Canada for training and administrative support functions. Their maintenance and repair will be supported commercially through a well-established local dealer network, benefiting Canadian industry and local economies. For the Canadian Forces, this will also lower support costs and increase availability. This is especially important to the Reserves, who will be the main user.
http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/newsroo..._e.asp?id=1961

The truck deals is for 1.2B$
June 29th, 2006  
loki
 
Mod Edit: What about stay on topic didn't you understand?
 


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