Can S.Korea handle N.Korea alone? - Page 6




 
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Boots
 
September 29th, 2004  
A Can of Man
 
 
America's intervention is pretty much a 100% guarantee. China might intervene but chances of intervention are very high.
Just when you thought this flash point was over with...
September 29th, 2004  
Boobies
 
 

Topic: hmmm....


I think initially the South Koreans will win becasue of the technical advancement. But what if the attrition build up over times? Do SK civilian have the tenacities to defend SK? Democracy can soften people with its good living tho.

Alos, how 13 guys killed 400 VCs? I mean not 400 soldiers ran out of ammos at once and start fist to fist against the SK soldiers. Is this unit named Tiger Unit that mentioned mcuh in the U.S.?

Did SK make a movie of it? Does the movie have subtitle? I love to see it.

Here is a link to discuss about the 13 SK Soldiers story in vietname.

http://www.strategypage.com/messageb...ges/74-572.asp
September 29th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Attrition, in the long run, favors South Korea because they have a larger population. Obviously, both sides will enlist as many people as possible in a full-scale war.
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Boots
September 29th, 2004  
Doppleganger
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_13th_redneck
Like I said, the best who get to fight their enemies abroad.
We don't exactly know how good the big chunk of these guys are. No doubt the best are absolutely superb. We just don't know what the vast majority are like.

Right now North Korea is weak. They may be playing this according to Sun Tzu's Art of War. When weak, pretend to be strong. They know we know little about their special operations unit. While satellites can count tanks etc. it cannot measure the ability of a soldier. There is a pretty good chance this could be one of the most incredible deceptions in modern history.
Weak and *very* concerned for the future. Look at it this way. Their only ally the Chinese are swiftly moving to a capitalist economy which will explode in the next few years. Why do you think all the world's biggest companies are desperate to get into China? Look at the recent Grand Prix held there which in many ways was a backdoor into China for many big Western industries. How do you think this makes the North Koreans feel when their only ally is moving towards the very ideology they so desperately hate.
September 29th, 2004  
Damien435
 
 
North Korea is not based on Chinese Communism, it was built by the Soviets. The Chinese and Soviets never got along that well, Mao always wanted more supplies from the Soviet Union and Stalin was not very trusting of anyone. It was the collapse of the Soviet Union that doomed the North Korean economy, which was very heavily dependent on aid from the USSR.

And once again, Kim Jong Il is crazy, not like "Woah, did you see what that guy did? He is crazy man!" but like clinically insane. Look at what he has done to the country, he made them into basically a cult, worse than the Nazi's.
September 29th, 2004  
Boobies
 
 

Topic: Like it...


Like Damien said, Korean and Chinese communism are different. Chinese never really liked the Soviet system because it was very rigid and focused on urban area when most area belonged to rural.

So, Mao replaced the Soviet model with his during the Famous Long March.

At this time, I don't think China is a big ally of N.K. because of the change in economic status and eventual political reforms.

I think N.K. leader should really thinking of economic reform and the well-being of its people. Feed them first.

However, I am wondering why the U.S. wont sign an agreement of carrying out pre-em strike with the N.K.? If the agreement can help N.K. to soften up its stands, why not?

N.K. is really alone on this issue.
September 29th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Possibly the best thing that South Korea could do is go ahead and run the arms race with the North and run them into the ground with with their superior production capabilities and wealth. Once their dreams of invasion and conquest are thoroughly dashed, perhaps they'll consider a more peaceful solution.
September 29th, 2004  
FlyingFrog
 
N.Korea is already considering economic reform. They are trying to set up a economic free zone to be run by a Chinese bussiness man (he is now in prison but will be freed soon).
September 29th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingFrog
N.Korea is already considering economic reform. They are trying to set up a economic free zone to be run by a Chinese bussiness man (he is now in prison but will be freed soon).
North Korea seeking reform is certainly encouraging. Who is this businessmant in prison anyways?
September 29th, 2004  
FlyingFrog
 
This Chinese business man is Yang Bin, 40 years old, with some 2 billion dollars.

He was arrested due to political reason (but they say it is about tax problem) after he was pointed to be the Govenour of that Free Economic Zone by N.K. president Kim.

He is sentenced to 15 years, but will be freed end this year or so.