Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain




 
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Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain
 
April 15th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 

Topic: Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain


Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain
Greetings, I came across this on youtube and I thought I would like to share with all...

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptijNcDanVw&feature=related"]Bloody foreigners. Untold Battle of Britain. (polskie napisy) - YouTube[/ame]

I always knew that Britain at that time had many pilots that came from many of her colonies, but this movie was really interesting to watch...

Enjoy...
April 15th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
Greetings, I came across this on youtube and I thought I would like to share with all...

Bloody foreigners. Untold Battle of Britain. (polskie napisy) - YouTube

I always knew that Britain at that time had many pilots that came from many of her colonies, but this movie was really interesting to watch...

Enjoy...
The highest scoring Ace was a Polish bloke called Witold Urbanowicz of 303 Sqn.

What was a disgrace, Polish servicemen were not allowed to take part in the VE Day march past. Bloody Stalin and politics.
April 15th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
The highest scoring Ace was a Polish bloke called Witold Urbanowicz of 303 Sqn.

What was a disgrace, Polish servicemen were not allowed to take part in the VE Day march past. Bloody Stalin and politics.
The Polish were some of the most aggressive fighter pilots flying.
One intelligence officer said he always knew he was looking at Polish, Czech, etc. gun camera film with out looking at the names, because they always got closer than anyone else, to ensure a kill!
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Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain
April 15th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Polish servicemen battled all over europe with the allies but were abandoned by them in favor of Stalin. A disgrace.
April 15th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
Polish servicemen battled all over europe with the allies but were abandoned by them in favor of Stalin. A disgrace.
The Poles were without doubt, brave and determined fighters, it was the Pole who after all took Monte Cassino.

But lets not forget the other nationalities who fought in the Battle of Britain:-

Czechs
Americans
Canadians
New Zealanders
Australians
South Africans
Rhodesians
Southern Irish
French
Jamaican
Sri Lankan

Each and everyone of them a brave man, without whom the Battle of Britain could never have been won.
April 15th, 2012  
03USMC
 
 


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_z2fVNnI6ms"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_z2fVNnI6ms[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32lL_DO71vE"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32lL_DO71vE[/ame]

http://homepage.mac.com/oldtownman/W...esquadron.html
April 15th, 2012  
Big_Z
 
 
Interesting stuff. I never knew they had their own formations.
April 16th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Z
Interesting stuff. I never knew they had their own formations.
Very much so Big Z.

The first Eagle Squadron (No. 71) was formed in September 1940, and became operational for defensive duties on 5 February 1941. The three Eagle Squadrons were numbered 71, 121, and 133. Of the thousands that volunteered, 244 Americans served with the three Eagle Squadrons; 16 Britons also served as Squadron and Flight commanders.

71 Squadron commenced operations base at RAF Church Fenton in early 1941, before a move to Kirton-in-Lindsay. In April the Squadron transferred to RAF Martlesham Heath in Suffolk for operations over Europe. During May they suffered their first loss when Mike Kolendorski was killed during a fighter sweep over Holland. Intensity of operations stepped up with a move into No 11 Group of Fighter Command, being based at RAF North Weald by June 1941.

On 2 July William J. Hall became the first 'Eagle' pilot to become a POW when he was shot down during an escort mission. The squadron's first confirmed victory came on 21 July 1941 when P/O W. Dunn destroyed a Messerschmitt Bf 109F over Lille. In August the Spitfire Mk II replaced their Hurricanes, before quickly re-equipping with the latest Spitfire Mk V. The unit soon established a high reputation, and numerous air kill claims were made in RAF fighter sweeps over the continent during the summer and autumn of 1941. In December the Squadron was rested back at Martlesham Heath, before a move to Debden in May 1942.

On 29 September 1942, the three squadrons were officially turned over by the RAF to the fledgling Eighth Air Force of the USAAF and became the 4th Fighter Group. The Eagle pilots had earned 12 Distinguished Flying Crosses and one Distinguished Service Order. Only four of the 34 original Eagle pilots were still present when the squadrons joined the USAAF.

Typical were the fates of the eight original pilots in the third squadron: Four died during training, one was disqualified, two died in combat, and one was a prisoner of war. About 100 Eagle pilots had been killed, were missing, or were prisoners. Negotiations regarding the transfer between the Eagle Squadrons, USAAF, and the RAF had to resolve a number of issues. The RAF wanted some compensation for losing three front-line squadrons in which they had heavily invested. Determining what rank each pilot would assume in the USAAF had to be negotiated, with most being given a rank equivalent to their RAF rank. For example, a Wing Commander became a Major. None of the Eagle Squadron pilots had served in the USAAF and did not have US pilot wings. It was decided to give them US pilot wings upon their transfer.

Major General Carl Spaatz, head of the USAAF in Europe, wanted to spread the experience of the Eagles amongst various new US fighter squadrons. However, the pilots of the three Eagle Squadrons wanted to stay together. The 71, 121, and 133 squadrons were respectively designated by the USAAF as the 334th, 335th, and 336th and transferred as complete units, retaining their Spitfires until P-47 Thunderbolts became available in January 1943. The 4th Fighter Group flew Spitfires until its conversion to P-47s was completed in April 1943. The 4th Fighter Wing, along with the 334th, 335th, and 336th Fighter Squadrons, exist today at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in Goldsboro, North Carolina and are part of the Ninth Air Force.
April 16th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
The Polish were some of the most aggressive fighter pilots flying.
One intelligence officer said he always knew he was looking at Polish, Czech, etc. gun camera film with out looking at the names, because they always got closer than anyone else, to ensure a kill!
According to the video, whilst other pilots will start shooting from a range of 400 meters, the Polish pilots will cloose in to about 100 metres, and they will open up... what guts...!
April 16th, 2012  
LeEnfield
 
 
I must say I dislike the title of on this thread, growing up as a young lad I can't remember any one having a go at the troops from overseas, and my I think we had them from nearly every country in the world. Okay there were some disagreements over girls and there were plenty of young men in all the forces stationed in the UK who were not beyond throwing a few punches if they felt another unit had insulted them, but I never heard of any one saying the word Bloody Foreigners.

The Eagle Squadrons......Now America did say that they could stay together as a unit but then broke there word and split them up and any American that wanted to stay with the friends that he had made in the RAF was told that if he did not transfer he would be called up and spend the rest of the war as a private in the army losing all his rank. If he did not comply with the transfer they would lose their citizenship and would become stateless.
 


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