Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain - Page 4




 
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Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain
 
April 17th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Lets face it the Mustang was designed to British Spec's and the US had little interest in it till they went to war. It was the British that decided to put a Merlin engine in it and turn it into a world class fighter, and the Bubble canopy was also a British conversion that was taken up by America.

Many of the Poles and Checz's stayed on in Britain along with nearly 100.000 Germans rather than go home ander live under Communist rule
OK, I can understand the Checz and the the Poles, but 100,000 Germans? Were they PoWs? Or are they refugees from the war?

This is getting interesting...
April 17th, 2012  
LeEnfield
 
 
They were German POW that did not want to return to East Germany under the Communist Government and they applied to stay in the UK, most of them over time drifted back to West Germany, but I did meet many of them who married and settled in the UK. Quite number even joined the British Army, the funny thing was we had one in our Regiment who fought against us at Arnhem.
April 18th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
OK, I can understand the Checz and the the Poles, but 100,000 Germans? Were they PoWs? Or are they refugees from the war?

This is getting interesting...
When I lived in Essex, a friend of mine, his dad was a German POW, apparently he was a 88 gunner when he was captured I beleive in North Africa. He ended up as a POW in Essex and married a local girl after the war. As LeeEnfield said, many of them were from what became East Germany and had enough of despotic rule.

During the war there were also about 10,000 Germans who fought for the British.
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Bloody Foreigners: Battle of Britain
April 18th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
OK, I can understand the Checz and the the Poles, but 100,000 Germans? Were they PoWs? Or are they refugees from the war?

This is getting interesting...
A lot of former German POWs had nothing to go back to.
It had all been destroyed.
In "Through Hell For Hitler" by Henry Metelmann, he describes how after being released from captivity, he returned to Hamburgh, only to find his family and home gone. So he returned to England were as a POW he worked on a farm and formed friendships with numerous locals.
He married a local girl, and became a signal man for British Rail.
April 18th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
When I lived in Essex, a friend of mine, his dad was a German POW, apparently he was a 88 gunner when he was captured I beleive in North Africa. He ended up as a POW in Essex and married a local girl after the war. As LeeEnfield said, many of them were from what became East Germany and had enough of despotic rule.

During the war there were also about 10,000 Germans who fought for the British.
Ok, Mr Brit, now I get the picture that these Germans who stayed behind in UK after war, they did it for reasons that you and others mentioned.

As for Germans fighting for the Allies, or in this case the British- the only time I heard of something like this was a unit called S.I.G (Special Identification Unit?). But what I heard and read was that these group was mainly comprised of German Jews- is this correct?
April 18th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
Ok, Mr Brit, now I get the picture that these Germans who stayed behind in UK after war, they did it for reasons that you and others mentioned.

As for Germans fighting for the Allies, or in this case the British- the only time I heard of something like this was a unit called S.I.G (Special Identification Unit?). But what I heard and read was that these group was mainly comprised of German Jews- is this correct?
German jewish refugees served in the British Army in many roles.
They were mainly restricted to the Pioneer Corps and non combattant duties as, unfortunately, they were never trusted fully by the authorities. However some did serve in combat units.
They had to choose a non German, or Jewish names, and their ID tags and papers were marked with these new names and with no mention of their religion incase they became POWs.
A great book to read is "Arnhem Lift" by Louis Hagen.
He was a German Jewish refugee who was interned initialy when he arrived in England, but then was able to join the Pioneers, and later the Glider Pilot Regiment where he flew Horsas into Arnhem.
His story is quite moving at times and a fascinating record of a small part of the battle of Arnhem. Well worth a read.
April 18th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
One or two were pilots in the RAF, another was in tanks and that's just off the top of my head.
April 18th, 2012  
42RM
 
The Special Interrogation Group was made up mostly by German-speaking Jewish volunteers from the British Mandate of Palestine. Using German equipment and uniforms, they operated behind German lines in the Western desert gathering intelligence.

No. 3 Troop in No. 10 (Inter-Allied) Commando were virtually all German speaking Jewish refugees mainly from Germany and Austria but also some from Czechoslovakia, Hungary and other European countries.
April 18th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
German jewish refugees served in the British Army in many roles.
They were mainly restricted to the Pioneer Corps and non combattant duties as, unfortunately, they were never trusted fully by the authorities. However some did serve in combat units.
They had to choose a non German, or Jewish names, and their ID tags and papers were marked with these new names and with no mention of their religion incase they became POWs.
A great book to read is "Arnhem Lift" by Louis Hagen.
He was a German Jewish refugee who was interned initialy when he arrived in England, but then was able to join the Pioneers, and later the Glider Pilot Regiment where he flew Horsas into Arnhem.
His story is quite moving at times and a fascinating record of a small part of the battle of Arnhem. Well worth a read.
Ok, will follow-up as suggested...
April 19th, 2012  
Der Alte
 
As a British POW you could freely return to the British, American or French zone in Germany even if you originally came from the part of Germany which now lay in the Soviet zone.

Many had nothing to come back to, no home, no job, no food, and perhaps no family. I also believe that the very humane and compassionate treatment, you as a German got in England was instrumental in that many Germans chose to stay in England and some also became British nationals.

I was lucky that my grandparents had a farm in northern Germany as the war had not really affected the rural agricultural areas in the north, so they gave me work and shelter. We lived like royalty even though we had to deliver a part of what we produced to the British occupation authorities.

My grandfather had had two French prisoners of war assigned to work on the farm throughout the war and they would really like to return to France. The day they went home, they came over to my grandfather and gave him their hand and thanked him for a good treatment. My grandfather who had fought against the French during the First World War and spoke a little French expressed that this was hopefully the last time that we in Europe would throw us into the madness of war. He was a strict but a fair man and he never quite understood the National Socialist ideology. He was a man of the old school.

Yes, it was a tough time for many Germans, but I was blessed.
 


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