Biggest Blunders in Military History - Page 9




 
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March 20th, 2005  
melkor the first
 

Topic: Biggest Blunder


While there are so many to choose from I'm torn between choosing because the difference between strategic, tactical and operational make for such a smorgasboard. Hitler's declaration of war on the the US when he was not required to do so by the TriParte agreement(John Keegan noted that Von Ribbentrop argued against this!!!) probably stands apart because one can understand his motivation in attacking the Soviet Union and argue whether or not he could have won by attacking on his original schedule. Tactically-Lee at Gettysburgh and Grant at Cold Harbor probably both tie for second behind Burnside dual performance at Fredericksburg and the Crater. BUT .... As a devout reader of the Flashman Papers I have a soft spot for Elphinstone and the retreat from Kabul which would would not pass a fiction writers criteria for believability. George Macdonald Fraser's comment that the greatest military geniuses could not have destroyed that army as surely as he did in trying to preserve it is unsurpassable. Thanks
March 21st, 2005  
The Other Guy
 
 
burnside made himself look like a total idiot.


NOTE: I am a "yankee", too.
March 21st, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Well.

Battle of the Bulge.
Dunkirk
Normandy

ect......
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March 22nd, 2005  
serbianpower
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadet Airman Adam Seaman
Well.

Battle of the Bulge.
Dunkirk
Normandy

ect......
I am not sure that Normandy was blunder.
March 22nd, 2005  
Claymore
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadet Airman Adam Seaman
Well.

Battle of the Bulge.
Dunkirk
Normandy

ect......
For whom are you saying each of these were blunders?
March 22nd, 2005  
Doppleganger
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claymore
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadet Airman Adam Seaman
Well.

Battle of the Bulge.
Dunkirk
Normandy

ect......
For whom are you saying each of these were blunders?
It couldn't be anyone other than Germany, as in all 3 cases there was evidence of German mistakes in some way. I wouldn't agree that any of them were in any way the biggest blunders that Germany committed in WW2 though.
March 22nd, 2005  
Young Winston
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charge_7
I'm surprised that Chewie or other ANZAC folks didn't mention Gallipoli. A tremendous loss of lives and ships that did not accomplish one single thing decisive in WWI and was the scene of error after error after error. Nobody can question the valor of the troops, but the generals involved and Churchill who promoted it made a very grievious error indeed.
I agree with c7.

You can also throw in "Stalingrad".
March 22nd, 2005  
melkor the first
 

Topic: Biggest Blunders


Churchill really doesn't deserve the blame for the Gallipoli Campaign- it would have succeeded had they landed(1) after the initial bombardment or (2) the commanders on the spot had moved and taken the heights when they did land. This same sort of inaction plagued the British in WW2 when they failed to capture Caen on D-Day and when they failed to secure the banks of the Scheldt. These failures were the direct causes of GOODWOOD and MARKET GARDEN- the twin howlers on Monty's reputation. As to the biggest blunders I'd like to mention the Romans Varus and Crassus who both managed to stop the Empires expansion and George Washington whose reputation as a military genius is based upon beting drunken Hessians and not on a study of his actual campaigns(The New York and Philadelphia campaigns are painful reading).Santa Anna( the Texan revolution and actions in the Mexican War)rivals Washington with the Alamo as his claim to fame and.,predating Hitler and Naploleon, Charles XII at Poltava.
March 22nd, 2005  
Doppleganger
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiejohn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charge_7
I'm surprised that Chewie or other ANZAC folks didn't mention Gallipoli. A tremendous loss of lives and ships that did not accomplish one single thing decisive in WWI and was the scene of error after error after error. Nobody can question the valor of the troops, but the generals involved and Churchill who promoted it made a very grievious error indeed.
I agree with c7.

You can also throw in "Stalingrad".
Stalingrad is a good example of German strategic blundering, especially when they could have captured the city with little effort in July '42, but Kursk was even worse.
March 22nd, 2005  
serbianpower
 

Topic: Re: Biggest Blunders


Quote:
Originally Posted by melkor the first
Churchill really doesn't deserve the blame for the Gallipoli Campaign- it would have succeeded had they landed(1) after the initial bombardment or (2) the commanders on the spot had moved and taken the heights when they did land. This same sort of inaction plagued the British in WW2 when they failed to capture Caen on D-Day and when they failed to secure the banks of the Scheldt. These failures were the direct causes of GOODWOOD and MARKET GARDEN- the twin howlers on Monty's reputation. As to the biggest blunders I'd like to mention the Romans Varus and Crassus who both managed to stop the Empires expansion and George Washington whose reputation as a military genius is based upon beting drunken Hessians and not on a study of his actual campaigns(The New York and Philadelphia campaigns are painful reading).Santa Anna( the Texan revolution and actions in the Mexican War)rivals Washington with the Alamo as his claim to fame and.,predating Hitler and Naploleon, Charles XII at Poltava.

apart from tactical and operational side of gallipoli, I think that that campaign was strategic blunter, when you consider global situation in south east europe in 1915. main goal was to make gap betveen turkeys mainland and rest of their allys in europe. by april 1915 austro hungary launched 2 massive campaigns against serbia, and was defeated with heavy losses. if only forces used in gallipoli were used in serbia, I am sure that austro hungaria would be defeated by the end of 1915, bulgaria would not join central powers, and probably war would be much shorter.