Best Tank of WW2 - Page 3




 
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August 14th, 2005  
Wildcat
 
I am polish and I have few troubles with english language...Sorry ...
I agree with you...I was talking about sloped armour...But I used bad word...Obviously, sloped armour is good thing...But german Panther had sloped armour too and they designed their tank this way because they saw T-34 and its armour which was difficult to destroy...Caterpillars was also seen in T-34...
August 14th, 2005  
Doppleganger
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadet Seaman
And the Germans really never used sloped armor.
The Panther, the Stug III Ausf G, the Jagdpanther, the Jagdpanzer IV, the King Tiger and Hummel all used sloped armour during WW2.
August 15th, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doppleganger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadet Seaman
And the Germans really never used sloped armor.
The Panther, the Stug III Ausf G, the Jagdpanther, the Jagdpanzer IV, the King Tiger and Hummel all used sloped armour during WW2.
I meant to a certain degree. Unlike todays armor, the M1A1 for example and the Challenger. Turrets where more circular and sphereical than square in that era.
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August 15th, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 


I was just reading up on the King Tiger and found that there where two types of turrets. Henschel turret and Porsche turret.
August 16th, 2005  
SAINT
 
TIGER II

August 16th, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAINT
TIGER II


Not really.
August 17th, 2005  
recondo_fr
 
 

Topic: Re: Best Tank of WW2


My preferences goes to :

JagdPanther in ambush
Panther G makes "rampage" on battlefields

August 18th, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
The King Tiger is very similar to todays modern tank in many ways, but lacks the computerised fire systems, thank goodness our chaps did not run into to many of them. But the best tank of WW2 I think would have to go to the Russian T 34. It's extra wide tracks made very good in all terrains, it's sloping armour gave it that extra protection. It was crude and simple and easy to maintain and did it's job extremely well. The tiger was a fine tank and when it worked it first class but they had so many problems with it on the mechanical side and it was over engineered which put many repair task beyond the crews ability to do them.
August 18th, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
The King Tiger is very similar to todays modern tank in many ways, but lacks the computerised fire systems, thank goodness our chaps did not run into to many of them. But the best tank of WW2 I think would have to go to the Russian T 34. It's extra wide tracks made very good in all terrains, it's sloping armour gave it that extra protection. It was crude and simple and easy to maintain and did it's job extremely well. The tiger was a fine tank and when it worked it first class but they had so many problems with it on the mechanical side and it was over engineered which put many repair task beyond the crews ability to do them.
The Sherman had small track so it could fit onto Eruopian rail bridges. I dislike the T-34. It had horrid engine and mechanical problems, radios failed, but on the plus side she was upgunned to 85mm.
August 18th, 2005  
Doppleganger
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
The King Tiger is very similar to todays modern tank in many ways, but lacks the computerised fire systems, thank goodness our chaps did not run into to many of them. But the best tank of WW2 I think would have to go to the Russian T 34. It's extra wide tracks made very good in all terrains, it's sloping armour gave it that extra protection. It was crude and simple and easy to maintain and did it's job extremely well. The tiger was a fine tank and when it worked it first class but they had so many problems with it on the mechanical side and it was over engineered which put many repair task beyond the crews ability to do them.
All German tanks were over-engineered. The biggest problem with the King Tiger, aside from its poor mobility, was the fact that all were rushed to the front as soon as they were built. This tank had no pre-production trials whatsoever and I guess it wasn't surprising that half of them simply broke down due to mechanical failures.