Beretta handguns in the 60s and today.




 
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January 6th, 2006  
Mohmar Deathstrike
 
 

Topic: Beretta handguns in the 60s and today.


My dad told me that the standard pistol the Italian Army used in 1969 was made by Beretta (he doesn't remember type model it was exactly). He said that among the advantages was the fact that its chances of jamming were slim even after being in water or mud.

But the greatest drawback was the fact that, after a round had been chambered, the only way of removing it was fireing the weapon.

I believe that some of the US Armed Forces are using Beretta handguns today (again, I don't know which ones). Does the same problem persist?
January 6th, 2006  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mohmar Deathstrike
My dad told me that the standard pistol the Italian Army used in 1969 was made by Beretta (he doesn't remember type model it was exactly). He said that among the advantages was the fact that its chances of jamming were slim even after being in water or mud.

But the greatest drawback was the fact that, after a round had been chambered, the only way of removing it was fireing the weapon.

I believe that some of the US Armed Forces are using Beretta handguns today (again, I don't know which ones). Does the same problem persist?

All U.S. Armed Forces us the Beretta 92 Pistol, with the exception of SF units. I know that sometimes acidential discharges happen when unloading the 92.
January 8th, 2006  
5.56X45mm
 
 
All handguns have a chance of acidential discharges. It is the operator, not the pistol that is unsafe.

I have never had a Beretta 92 do a AD. I always remove the magazine, place the weapon on safe. Manually rack the slide back, thus ejecting the cartridge. Once the cartridge is ejected, I check the breech of the firearm. Either by a visual check or if it's in a low light or no light area. I check with my pinky finger. After that, I allow the slide to go forward and that's it.
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January 8th, 2006  
Mohmar Deathstrike
 
 
Thanks for the info, guys.

The Italian Armed Forces now use the Beretta 92 aswell by the way.
January 9th, 2006  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5.56X45mm
All handguns have a chance of acidential discharges. It is the operator, not the pistol that is unsafe.

I have never had a Beretta 92 do a AD. I always remove the magazine, place the weapon on safe. Manually rack the slide back, thus ejecting the cartridge. Once the cartridge is ejected, I check the breech of the firearm. Either by a visual check or if it's in a low light or no light area. I check with my pinky finger. After that, I allow the slide to go forward and that's it.
Ya, but not every private is as gun savvy as you 5.56
January 9th, 2006  
5.56X45mm
 
 
Firearm saftey is something that is very important. Even if you are someone that lives around them daily. One most always remember that a firearm, while just a tool. Is a tool that can easily take a life. SAFTEY is number one.

Every person that owns or handle firearms should know that. PERIOD. And every military service should inforce firearm saftey as it's number one course during basic.
January 9th, 2006  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5.56X45mm
Firearm saftey is something that is very important. Even if you are someone that lives around them daily. One most always remember that a firearm, while just a tool. Is a tool that can easily take a life. SAFTEY is number one.

Every person that owns or handle firearms should know that. PERIOD. And every military service should inforce firearm saftey as it's number one course during basic.
I hear you there.
January 13th, 2006  
03USMC
 
 
Never had a ND with an M9 or the 96FS.
January 13th, 2006  
Missileer
 
 
We had barrels of sand where we cleared our .45 pistols. First, remove the clip, jack the slide back and look in the chamber. Point the unloaded pistol into the barrel and pull the trigger. I only saw one Sergeant pop a round off. Some goose on guard duty was playing with his weapon and shot the tip of his ring finger off. The Sergeant of the guard went to the post and brought the weapon back and went through the motions of removing the clip, but then, he pointed the pistol at the sand and fired off a round. I don't think he knew there was a round left in it but after the guy had shot himself, he had to realize that another round had been loaded.
January 14th, 2006  
Mohmar Deathstrike
 
 
When my dad was on guard duty during his national service in '69 they always had to shoot at a sandbag at the beginning of each shift. I think the weapons they were using were Winchester Carbines.