Benefits of a society with a different view on human rights.




 
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Benefits of a society with a different view on human rights.
 
December 29th, 2005  
bulldogg
 
 

Topic: Benefits of a society with a different view on human rights.


Benefits of a society with a different view on human rights.
Quote:
China is ready to mass-produce a vaccine undergoing human trials to protect people from catching the H5N1 flu virus from birds, the state-run Xinhua news agency reported.
Researchers are preparing to produce the experimental vaccine in massive quantities, said Yin Weidong, an expert on the project. The clinical tests will be finished in about a year, Xinhua said.
High-risk groups, such as poultry farm workers and medical workers, would be vaccinated if the trials are a success, according to Yin.
The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is also conducting human trials on a vaccine for the H5N1 virus.
The virus has devastated poultry populations across Asia and killed more than 71 people since it first appeared more than two years ago. Almost all victims were in close contact with birds.
China has reported 26 outbreaks of the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu in poultry since October 19 and six human cases, with two confirmed deaths.
Experts fear the virus could mutate into a new strain that could spread easily from human to human, causing a global pandemic.
American researchers, meanwhile, say they have been unable to link the spread of the virus to the migratory patterns of wild birds, suggesting domestic poultry, such as chickens, ducks and geese, are the primary transmitters of bird flu.–AP
China is ready to mass-produce a vaccine undergoing human trials to protect people from catching the H5N1 flu virus from birds, the state-run Xinhua news agency reported.
Researchers are preparing to produce the experimental vaccine in massive quantities, said Yin Weidong, an expert on the project. The clinical tests will be finished in about a year, Xinhua said.
High-risk groups, such as poultry farm workers and medical workers, would be vaccinated if the trials are a success, according to Yin.
The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is also conducting human trials on a vaccine for the H5N1 virus.
The virus has devastated poultry populations across Asia and killed more than 71 people since it first appeared more than two years ago. Almost all victims were in close contact with birds.
China has reported 26 outbreaks of the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu in poultry since October 19 and six human cases, with two confirmed deaths.
Experts fear the virus could mutate into a new strain that could spread easily from human to human, causing a global pandemic.
American researchers, meanwhile, say they have been unable to link the spread of the virus to the migratory patterns of wild birds, suggesting domestic poultry, such as chickens, ducks and geese, are the primary transmitters of bird flu.–AP
China is ready to mass-produce a vaccine undergoing human trials to protect people from catching the H5N1 flu virus from birds, the state-run Xinhua news agency reported.
Researchers are preparing to produce the experimental vaccine in massive quantities, said Yin Weidong, an expert on the project. The clinical tests will be finished in about a year, Xinhua said.
High-risk groups, such as poultry farm workers and medical workers, would be vaccinated if the trials are a success, according to Yin.
The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is also conducting human trials on a vaccine for the H5N1 virus.
The virus has devastated poultry populations across Asia and killed more than 71 people since it first appeared more than two years ago. Almost all victims were in close contact with birds.
China has reported 26 outbreaks of the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu in poultry since October 19 and six human cases, with two confirmed deaths.
Experts fear the virus could mutate into a new strain that could spread easily from human to human, causing a global pandemic.
American researchers, meanwhile, say they have been unable to link the spread of the virus to the migratory patterns of wild birds, suggesting domestic poultry, such as chickens, ducks and geese, are the primary transmitters of bird flu.
http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/53334.html