Australia and New Zealand - Page 9




 
--
Boots
 
January 24th, 2008  
AussieNick
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Del Boy
Aussie Nick - I was not referring to the expression, only the use of the word 'dunny' in it. This is the slang bit I thought was Aussie, as we have never used the word here, traditionally. I was just making the point that I have only heard it used in Aussie references.

That's why i thought the expression we are searching for related to Sydney rather than London. The answer will reveal all!
Oh yeah mate, dunny is used all the time. No idea of the background to it though.
January 24th, 2008  
Del Boy
 
I had great family friends here yesterday, over from Brisbane, but I didn't like to raise the question ; wouldn't been pretty uncool I reckon, even though they didn't seem very captivated by Sydney! Oh, and they were ladies!

Shane Warne is playing here again for Hampshire, but this is the football season, so i won't be seeing him ( he's a big hero here), so I've run out of Aussie sources. I used to have a number of Australian customers, and I used employ some good guys in London, by the day, from the Overseas Club. We had a strong Aussie area in Earls Court then. I bet they would have known!
January 24th, 2008  
MontyB
 
 
This might be way off target but didn't Sydney have some fairly major sewage/odour issues around the 1870s and with Hyde Park being close to the harbour it may just be a piece of proximity slang so to speak.
--
Boots
January 25th, 2008  
Del Boy
 
Sounds a possibility.
May 14th, 2009  
Keeran
 
 

Topic: Dunny


The word comes from British dialect dunnekin meaning dung (feces) house.

It was first used in 1933 in Aus as slang.

There are also other spellings such as dunnigin and dunegan meaning privy
May 14th, 2009  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Padre
Location: Cowra, NSW.
I was completely unaware of this. Interesting.

I have heard a number of stories over the years. One that sticks in my mind which was told to me by an uncle, that during the liberation of Allied POW's from Japanese camps by the Aussies, those POW's who were fit enough were issued a rifle and bayonet to guard their former captors. A lot of grievances were repayed in spades.

Whether this is true or not I cannot say, but I'd be interested to hear any opinions on this.
May 18th, 2009  
bren122
 
 
Depends on what you read and who you know.
Stan Arneill, a survivor of Changi, said he never saw anything like that happen. All medicos from the Burma Railway are somewhat reticent about it- Dunlop said he heard of such things but never saw; Rowley Richards said something similar though conceded it might have happened.
In her Book 'Prisoners of War- from Gallipoli to the Korean War' Patsy Adam-Smith makes a great deal of survivor statements that they were simply glad to survive. In his book 'Prisoners Under Nippon' Hank Nelson makes the same sort of argument for the survivors but notes that this was not always the same with their liberators though he cites no specific examples. Richard Paull in his book 'Kokoda- the New Guinea Campaign of 1942', published shortly after the war, is about the only book that makes a specific allegation, to my knowledge, and this is again a liberator's revenge rather than a survivor- the soldiers involved came upon the scene of Australian soldiers used for bayonet practice and 'gave no quarter to the Japs there'. the Oxford Guide to Australian Military History makes mention of the killing of prisoners by Australians a number of times but not in relation to the Pacific War.
the best you can say is that it probably did happen to some extent; but like the situation in Europe the killing of guards was generally done by liberators rather than inmates.
May 18th, 2009  
bren122
 
 
would it be fair to say that this is dead?
then try this; military units were recruited from Australia for the first time for service in which conflict?
May 24th, 2009  
bren122
 
 
a clue?
closer to home than you might imagine.
May 26th, 2009  
MontyB
 
 
I would have guessed the Boer War.