Artifacts from the Big One




 
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March 23rd, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 

Topic: Artifacts from the Big One


I spent a few hours watching these videos in which people are using metal detector from the Second World War and they were finding a lot of stuff. I don't know much about how munitions behave after being buried since the war. They were finding panzer fausts, mortal shells, hand grenades, 20mm and 40mm AAA shells.

How dangerous is this kind of munition after all this time? Bombs cause a huge evacuation when they are found.
March 24th, 2017  
BritinAfrica
 
 
In France as you are probably aware, are thousands of tons of shells and other explosives left over from WW1, experts are saying some of it is too dangerous to move, some of the shells could contain poison gas such as mustard gas.

A few years ago a young boy and he buddy got onto a British Military live fire range, one of the boys found an unexploded 81MM mortar bomb so he decided to kick it. He finished up as a red mist. His buddy survived.
March 24th, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
The Baltic sea was a dumping place for a lot of stuff. Sometimes the fishermen get up something slightly different than fish. They got canisters of mustard gas. Some of them were hurt badly, but survived, though.

During the WWI the British used miners to plant huge amount of explosives beneath the German trenches and one of them is still there somewhere. I don't remember exactly where, can it be Somme?

The vids I watched. The people digging up stuff from the Eastern front don't handle shells and other stuff carefully.

Do we have any military engineers here?
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March 24th, 2017  
George
 
Doesn't make the news, but reportedly 1 person in the US is killed every year or so by Civil War munitions going off.
March 24th, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Wow, even from the US Civil War. The guys searching for stuff from the Second World War must be really crazy.
March 24th, 2017  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by I3BrigPvSk
Wow, even from the US Civil War. The guys searching for stuff from the Second World War must be really crazy.
certainly dangerous work. Have heard reports of people finding storage bunkers that had only the entrance blown, stocked with brand new rifles.
March 25th, 2017  
BritinAfrica
 
 
There is a British mine under the Canadian Memorial at Vimy Ridge.

In 1988, the Canadian Authorities at the Vimy Ridge Memorial Site, France, called on the British Government for assistance in investigating what they believed might be a large cache of black powder situated sixty feet below the surface of the park and quite close to the public areas.

Accompanied by a team of volunteers, Lt Col Phillip Robinson - a British Army Royal Engineer, made a detailed investigation of the "La Folie" tunnel system and confirmed that the black powder was in fact, an abandoned mine charge, left over from the First World War. The DURAND mine, (the tunnel leading to it had been constructed by French Tunnelling Engineers) constituted about 6,000lbs of the high explosive ammonal. Subsequent tests, however, revealed the powder to be highly degraded and incapable of detonation.

In 1996, Lt Col Robinson returned to Vimy after further investigation had indicated another, much larger charge still lying dormant under the ridge. The BROADMARSH - so called because it sits under an area of the same name - was estimated to be 20,000lbs and lying uncomfortably close to a busy road junction within a part of the Memorial site that sees many thousands of cars, coaches and pedestrians passing over it each year.

The Canadian Authorities, mindful of their 'duty of care' to those visiting the site, agreed to an investigation. In October 1997, having assembled a team of specialist civilian and military personnel for the operation, Lt Col Robinson returned to Vimy Ridge and successfully excavated the BROADMARSH mine. In 1998, inspired by ethos of the tunnellers and the achievements at Vimy, team member Lt Col Mike Watkins proposed a continuation of the work and those present would form the nucleus of what is now The Durand Group.

Further analysis of the DURAND mine in February 1998 concluded that, far from inert, the explosive ammonal under the top layers of the charge was still in perfect working order and that the instability of the primers and detonators posed a very real risk to the general public on the surface.

This mine charge was subsequently made safe, as too was another, smaller mine - a CAMOUFLET designed to blow an enemy tunnel - further south within the "La Folie" system. It is not thought that any further charges - of British origin - exist within the Memorial Site boundary.

In August 1998 tragedy struck. Whilst trying to gain entrance to an incline into "O" Sector - a mining system to the south of "La Folie" - Lt Col Mike Watkins was killed when a section of clay sheared off.
March 25th, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
From my limited knowledge about explosives, shells, and other types of munition. Longer they stay in the ground, the more unstable they are.

What do you think about the people looking for artifacts? Some of the searching groups are looking for the fallen soldiers and trying to identify them. I have a respect for that. Other groups are out looking for just souvenirs.

Many of the groups seem to be Russian or Ukrainian, and when I don't speak any of the two languages. I don't really know what they are saying.
March 29th, 2017  
BritinAfrica
 
 
A couple of years ago a young boy arrived at the Port of Dover after a holiday in France with his parents. Customs officers pulled them over for a search where a live hand grenade was found in the boys luggage. Somewhat shocked both parents and customs asked where he got it, apparently it was sold to him by a French souvenir seller..

Bomb disposal experts have stated that to clear France of all munitions left over from WW1 will take up to 500 years to clear.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016...-bomb-disposa/
March 29th, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Is it allowed to dive on wrecks around the GB? I think the Norse don't allow scuba divers around their wrecks when they contain munitions
 


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