The American War for Independance - Page 5




 
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November 22nd, 2004  
redcoat
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dameon
England,Britian, and the United Kingdom are one in the same.
With that statement you are merely showing your lack of knowledge of British history.
England is just one of the 4 nations which make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and N. Ireland.
The other nations are Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.
The United Kingdom first came into existence in 1603 when Elizabeth I of England died and her nearest blood relative, the king of Scotland James VI became King of England as well (James I).
However both nations retained their separate parliaments, and it wasn't until the reign of William of Orange in 1707 that both the Scottish and English parliaments voted to merge at Westminster. This was known as the Act of Union. In 1800 Ireland was also added to the union at Westminster, the parliament was then renamed the parliament of Great Britain and Ireland (in 1922 it was changed to United Kingdom of Great Britain and N.Ireland)
In the war of 1812 it was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland which the USA declared war on.

ps, Great Britain is the name of the largest island within the British Isles, which contains the nations of England, Wales, and Scotland. So when you refer to Britain (not Britian) you are refering not just to England but Wales and Scotland as well.
November 22nd, 2004  
DTop
 
 
How did this thread get from the Revolutionary War to the War of 1812? Anyway some of the causes of and events leading to the War of 1812 are interesting. There's an account of these events at http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionar...War%20of%20181
It's worth a look IMO.

Here's an excerpt:
Quote:
Contemporary historians cite this sequence of events:

After the British defeated the French in the French and Indian War The French and Indian War was a nine-year conflict (1754-1763) in North America and was one of the conflict theatres of the Seven Years' War. The conflict was between Britain and its colonies on one side and France on the other. The war soon spread to Europe itself and Britain and France continued battling. Native Americans fought for both sides but primarily with the French. The major battles include French victories at Fort William Henry, Fort Ticonderoga and against the Braddock Expedition and British victories at Louisburg, Fort Niagara, Fort Duquesne and at the Plains of Abraham outside of Quebec City, in which James Wolfe defeated a French garrison led by Louis-Joseph de Montcalm.
After the British defeated the French in the French and Indian War The French and Indian War was a nine-year conflict (1754-1763) in North America and was one of the conflict theatres of the Seven Years' War. The conflict was between Britain and its colonies on one side and France on the other. The war soon spread to Europe itself and Britain and France continued battling. Native Americans fought for both sides but primarily with the French. The major battles include French victories at Fort William Henry, Fort Ticonderoga and against the Braddock Expedition and British victories at Louisburg, Fort Niagara, Fort Duquesne and at the Plains of Abraham outside of Quebec City, in which James Wolfe defeated a French garrison led by Louis-Joseph de Montcalm.
In 1763, the British began to settle Westward into North America.
Later that year, Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa organized native resistance among the Deleware (Lenape), Seneca, Chippewa, Miami, Potawatomi, and Huron. This is Pontiac's Rebellion.
Following a series of bloody battles (Bloody Run, Bushy Run, and the loss of eight British forts), came the Proclamation of 1763. To make peace with the Indians, this Royal proclamation prohibited Westward settlement. Colonial reaction to this proclamation was very negative. This proclamation was a significant cause of the American Revolution.
First the colonies, then the newly-formed United States turned Eastward as the seeds of the American Revolution began (1766) and ended (1783).
After the American Revolution, Britain wanted to keep an "Indian Buffer" between Canada and the new United States. To do this, Britain allied itself with the Native North American Indians.
In 1807, the HMS Leopard fired on and overhauled the USS Chesapeake, and impressed four US Navy seamen. Though the incident itself was minor, the implied attitude of the Royal Navy towards the USA - that it was independent only in name, and worthy of no esteem - outraged the American public.
In the Election of 1810, the interior frontier states elected the "Warhawks". The Warhawks believed in the nation's Manifest Destiny, and wanted to expand Westward. None of the Warhawks were from the seaboard states this fact is inconsistent with the idea that the War of 1812 was about Maritime law.
In 1811, William Henry Harrison attacked the Shawnees in the Battle of Tippecanoe.
In the U.S. presidential election, 1812, Madison justified the war of 1812 as a reaction to Britain's policies against American shipping (on June 1 that year he asked the United States Congress to declare war on the United Kingdom). This justification was needed to convince the coastal states that the war was necessary and important. The frontier states needed no justification. This is the first major war of the new country, and the first time that a war needed "justification" presented to its citizens. Ironically, as the textbook history below indicates, this first war of the new nation was also very unpopular.
Several days after Madison's war message to Congress, the Senate voted for war, 19 to 13, reflecting this unpopularity.

What is not in most history books is the role that Native North Americans played in the war of 1812. Five of the seven major land battles were fought against primarily Native American forces in the interior of the continent.

At the end of the war, the outcome was that Britain gave up its alliances with the Indian nations, in exchange for the US leaving Canada alone. Although, "no territory was won or lost", the War of 1812 signalled the end of Native North American-European alliances. This resulted in Western settlement becoming a "mopping up" operation. The US could now settle the West, unafraid of European alliances. Although thousands of lives were lost in later US-Indian wars, the outcomes of these conflicts were never in doubt.
November 22nd, 2004  
Darcia
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redcoat
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dameon
England,Britian, and the United Kingdom are one in the same.
With that statement you are merely showing your lack of knowledge of British history.
England is just one of the 4 nations which make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and N. Ireland.
The other nations are Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.
The United Kingdom first came into existence in 1603 when Elizabeth I of England died and her nearest blood relative, the king of Scotland James VI became King of England as well (James I).
However both nations retained their separate parliaments, and it wasn't until the reign of William of Orange in 1707 that both the Scottish and English parliaments voted to merge at Westminster. This was known as the Act of Union. In 1800 Ireland was also added to the union at Westminster, the parliament was then renamed the parliament of Great Britain and Ireland (in 1922 it was changed to United Kingdom of Great Britain and N.Ireland)
In the war of 1812 it was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland which the USA declared war on.

ps, Great Britain is the name of the largest island within the British Isles, which contains the nations of England, Wales, and Scotland. So when you refer to Britain (not Britian) you are refering not just to England but Wales and Scotland as well.

I know that I am just saying that if you ask any one of the Uk and Great Britian are the same, or england for that matter they will agree. That is just like calling The United States ,America not a big deal everyone knows who you are talking about.



The war of 1812 also helped throw the British out of North America.
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November 22nd, 2004  
redcoat
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dameon
I know that I am just saying that if you ask any one of the Uk and Great Britian are the same, or england for that matter they will agree.
They might in your neck of the woods, but not in mine!
By referring to England when you mean the UK or Britain you are just causing offense to the non English members of the UK.


Quote:
The war of 1812 also helped throw the British out of North America.
I'd always thought Canada was in North America
November 23rd, 2004  
Hiridion
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redcoat
They might in your neck of the woods, but not in mine!
By referring to England when you mean the UK or Britain you are just causing offense to the non English members of the UK.
Aye, it's a guaranteed way to seriously annoy anyone from Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland...
November 23rd, 2004  
Darcia
 
I will have to remember that if I ever go to the UK
December 4th, 2004  
swordrapier
 

Topic: war of 1812


Let me see the war of 1812... wasn't that the one where the only major battle that the in wich the united states successfully stopped UK objectives was the Battle of New Orleans. Curiously that battle took place 2 weeks after the treaty was signed. Seems like a pointless little war. For both sides.

Independence was won in the WFI. But it was not until 1789 when he Constitution was adopted did the country become something more than a military alliance between semi-autonomous states.

As for gaining respect from the war of 1812. I think that most of the world looked at the united states as being little more than an upstart punk trying to take one of that times "Superpowers". Do you think that the world would respect Mexico anymore if it declared war on the united states and promptly got handed its head? I personally think not.

The United States played little if any part in the world until WWI. It was too far from the action and too isolationist for most of the world to care.
December 4th, 2004  
Darcia
 
Actualy things such as the Spanish-American War, and the American Cival War lso affected how the world turned.
December 4th, 2004  
redcoat
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dameon
Actualy things such as the Spanish-American War, and the American Cival War lso affected how the world turned.
Go on then, tell us how
December 5th, 2004  
swordrapier
 
okay I will admit that the Spanish-American war was important to the History of the united states. However other than for the territories added to the United States not much happened.

As for the American Civil War. The major powers of europe sent military observers to the united states to watch the progress of the war. These observers went home and forgot the lessons that were learned. These lessons about how to fight with new weapons had to be relearned by europe in the Crimean War.

As for the political ramifications of the American Civil War on the world please don't tell me you think that cotton was king.

The United States was far more interested in the westward expansion and manifest destiny than playing in world politics

Of course there was the Tokyo bay incident.... but what did that accomplish? I Guess that it may have opened up some trade with Japan and opened the door for moderization of Japan. I guess that was some effect on world history.