Allies and Nazi forces usuing captured equipment - Page 6




 
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February 16th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Make a new thread, but I have little doubt it will devolve into a shouting match within days, this isnt the thread for this discussion.
I am sure we can both sensibly discuss the matter.
February 16th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
I have no doubt we both can either, I have grave doubts about others though.

You have to remember there are those on this forum that worship firearms and they tend to be extreme.

Anyway to move back to the original topic, here is a few pictures of Axis equipment in Allied hands...

Australians using Italian M13's.


Free Polish forces in German Pz-III's


American in a Pz-II
February 17th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
I never realised the Allies used enemy armour. It makes sense as so much was captured.

However, the only downside I can see is being taken out by your own side. At dusk or in low light Allied gunners see the silhouette of an enemy tank, BANG, cop hold of that.
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February 17th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
The Germans were so impressed with the T-34 that they used as many as they could get their hands on.
They would even modify it by adding German style commander cupolas and changing the Russian Mgs for their own.
When designing a tank to counter the T-34s on of the designs was so like the T-34 it was rejected on the grounds of the possibility of friendly fire incidents.
The eventual winner was the Mark V Panther.
They also used Shermans, but were less impressed by them, especially as the early ones tended to burst into flames when hit, hence the nick names "Tommy Cooker" and "Ronson" it would light first strike!
February 17th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Yes but interestingly enough the Panther had a tendency to brew up as well.

Allied Tanks in German Service...
Valentine's captured in Russia:




Rebuilt Matilda in German war games:


Firefly's:


Crusader:
February 17th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Yes but interestingly enough the Panther had a tendency to brew up as well.
Allied and German tank designers insisted on using petrol engines, hence their propensity for going up in flames.
The Russians had diesels which were not as likely to cook up.
The Germans, despite all their engineering greatness, could not design a fuel system that was free of leaks, and suffered numerous problems as a result.
It was the tank crews greatest fear, getting caught in a tank "brewing up"
Modern tanks have special additives to their fuels to reduce the risk of flash fires, fire suppression systems and crew uniforms made of fire proof materials, but I still wouldn't fancy my chances if I took a direct hit.
February 17th, 2012  
LeEnfield
 
 
On Suez troubles in 1956 we found that the Egyptians had scattered large numbers of AK 47's on the streets around the the towns along with magazines and bullets. As we were armed with the bolt action .303 rifle which was good but nothing like an AK 47 then it did not take us long to re-equip our selfs with AK 47's. We were quite upset when we had to turn them in when we went back to Cyprus
February 17th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
On Suez troubles in 1956 we found that the Egyptians had scattered large numbers of AK 47's on the streets around the the towns along with magazines and bullets. As we were armed with the bolt action .303 rifle which was good but nothing like an AK 47 then it did not take us long to re-equip our selfs with AK 47's. We were quite upset when we had to turn them in when we went back to Cyprus
It never fails to amaze me how we were still using a bolt action rifle, although a very good one up untill the mid 1950s when nearly every other country had gone over to semi automatic and, as with the Ak 47, fully automatics.
I know guys in the Falklands who swaped their semi auto SLRs for the fully automatic Argentinian ones, and they too were fairley miffed when they had to give them up.
February 17th, 2012  
LeEnfield
 
 
Talking to the Falklands Vets the fully automayic SLRs were not that good. On automatic they would go all over the place and were hard to keep on target on auto
February 17th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Talking to the Falklands Vets the fully automayic SLRs were not that good. On automatic they would go all over the place and were hard to keep on target on auto
Yes, and I don't think a 20 round mag would last too long either!
 


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