17 september 1939 - Page 7




 
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May 25th, 2010  
Naddoður
 
 

Topic: Conclusion


Thus by September 1, 1939, the pieces were in place for the beginning of a general European war. It would be a war for which Great Britain and France were egregiously unprepared. Meanwhile, Poland would pay in untold lives. France and Great Britain did indeed honor their signatures and declare war on Germany on September 3, 1939. Nevertheless, this proved to be a hollow declaration that provided no help to the Poles. From the evidence presented here is is clear that neither France nor Great Britain had the slightest intention of actually coming to the assistance of their Polish ally.

What transpired is by now well known. The RAF did not even attempt to bomb German military installations because, as the Air Staff concluded on September 20: "Since the immutable aim of the Allies is the ultimate defeat of Germany, without which the fate of Poland is permanently sealed, it would obviously be militarily unsound and to the disadvantage of all, including Poland, to undertake at any given moment operations ... unlikely to achieve effective results, merely for the sake of maintaining a gesture."

The Chiefs of Staff agreed, informing 10 Downing Street that "nothing we can do in the air in the Western Theatre would have any effect of relieving pressure on Poland." And so the RAF decided instead to drop propaganda leaflets.

For its part, the French army did launch a diversionary offensive into the Saar region. German defenses quickly stopped the attack, however, and it was never resumed. In fact, France and Great Britain would never launch an combined offensive during the first year of the war, preferring instead to await the German attack, which came in May 1940 and ended in disastrous defeat for both nations.

As General Ironside commented in 1945, after much of Europe was in ruins, "Militarily we should have gone all out against the German the minute he invaded Poland. ... We did not ... And so we missed the strategical advantage of the Germans being engaged in the East. We thought completely defensively and of ourselves." And so they did.
May 25th, 2010  
LeEnfield
 
 
Now the RAF Bombers where the Bombay and Whitley bombers with a few Blenheim's thrown in and they would not have much of an impression on Germany even if they got there. The Wellington had not come into service and there were no four engine bombers in service with the RAF.
May 25th, 2010  
Naddoður
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Now the RAF Bombers where the Bombay and Whitley bombers with a few Blenheim's thrown in and they would not have much of an impression on Germany even if they got there. The Wellington had not come into service and there were no four engine bombers in service with the RAF.
I know, and I believe that the British Air Staff made the right conclusion:

"Since the immutable aim of the Allies is the ultimate defeat of Germany, without which the fate of Poland is permanently sealed, it would obviously be militarily unsound and to the disadvantage of all, including Poland, to undertake at any given moment operations ... unlikely to achieve effective results, merely for the sake of maintaining a gesture."

But the fact is that the British politicians had promised the Poles that the Royal Air Force would attack industrial, civilian, and military targets in Germany.
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May 26th, 2010  
Partisan
 
 
Panzercracker, love your stuff, but you need to check on the geography a bit more. To get to Poland from England or France (by sea) you need to traverse the Skaggerak Strait & Kattegat Bay, notoriuosly treachorous waters. These waters are enclosed like a set of giant pincers by Norway, Sweden & Finland to the north & Denmark & Germany to the south, or you can choose the German Kiel Canal - either way best of luck with that expedition matey.
May 26th, 2010  
Panzercracker
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Partisan
Panzercracker, love your stuff, but you need to check on the geography a bit more. To get to Poland from England or France (by sea) you need to traverse the Skaggerak Strait & Kattegat Bay, notoriuosly treachorous waters. These waters are enclosed like a set of giant pincers by Norway, Sweden & Finland to the north & Denmark & Germany to the south, or you can choose the German Kiel Canal - either way best of luck with that expedition matey.
Ok for the sake of argument lets say UK could not get to Poland, what stopped the Brits from going to France? Heck why did Abbeville even happen?

Here's Poland not broken, not lost and suddenly those fockers meet at Abbeville and decide "its over there's no point helping."

WW2 France was a bunch of cowardly cunts and no amount of political correctness can change the fact that they were sh*ting their pants behind the M-line.

Brits however despite the small size of their army had an effective, highly motivated fighting force, given that between September 1-20 Germany in the west was defended by 200.000 guys with little more then their dicks a 60.000 strong regular british force would collapse entire german defence in hours.

I'm not bitching that French and Brits didnt do something specific, i'm bitching that they did not do anything, this was the moment when Germany was completely pants down in Poland and the largest armies and navies in the West just f*ck around doing nothing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Now the RAF Bombers where the Bombay and Whitley bombers with a few Blenheim's thrown in and they would not have much of an impression on Germany even if they got there. The Wellington had not come into service and there were no four engine bombers in service with the RAF.
Lee that is exactly the chamberlain-esque bullshyt that made Germans fock the hell out of french peasant chicks for 4 years and make Brits eat rationed food for 7 years.

Germans didnt expect the West to do zip for Poland, if Brits bombed the f*ck out of a couple of dozen small factories and rolled alone or with french towards Berlin the entire German plan would end up in a shitter since suddenly Germans would be forced to re-evaluate.

Tanks, infantry and planes would have to be withdrawn to face the West, polish Bzura offensive would still happen but even if it wouldnt be 100% succesfull it wouldnt get ground to dust after a week due to overwhelming amount of equipment Germans had and suddenly you have a stalemated Germany.

Poland may or may not get invaded by Russia but what it means for France is no German occupation, no Bob for UK, no bombed London etc.

The amazing fact is that this was the only time when Germany really was pants down defencless, barring moronic sci-fi claims of IIjadw Germans in the West were guys with rifles and that was it, no guns, no tans, no mortars, just bolt-****ing-action rifles against piles of heavy french and british equipment.

Lets assume 50.000 Brits go through France or Low countries with their tanks and mechanized components, what are the German defenders going to do? Headbutt the tanks to submission? 100% of Wehramcht is tied in combat by 15 Sept so Germany had no reserves, no possibility to relocate major troops, a single armored division would've made the difference in the West.
May 26th, 2010  
LeEnfield
 
 
Britain and France stood by their obligations and went to war, so okay you wont accept that Germany had rearmed, and had an Army running into millions of of well trained and well equipped men. These man had fought for Franco, retaken Austria and several other places, now there was no way that we were in a position to go to the aid of Poland at this time but we did got to war to try and free them. Now there were a lot of other countries around who just sat on their hands and made a fortune selling weapons to any one that had cash. Now I can't see the point in trying to discuss this any further with you as you have your mind set on what you think happened and my mind is set on what I can remember of these days. It took the might of Russia, America, Britain and it's Commonwealth Allies to defeat Germany and even then it took a lot of blood and guts to do that, so if any one thinks Germany could have been smashed when it invaded Poland really is a couple sandwiches short of a picnic.
May 27th, 2010  
Panzercracker
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Britain and France stood by their obligations and went to war,
No, they declared war and did absolutely nothing beyond declaring war, thats outright focking treason.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
so okay you wont accept that Germany had rearmed, and had an Army running into millions of of well trained and well equipped men.
That sir is a lie, normally in case of a moron like lldjaw i'd say its a mistake but you're smart enough to say you're lying.

Lets be done with blanket statements, Germany had roughly 2900 tanks, 1100 armored and recon cars and about 2.4 milion men worth of active troops.

Germany attacked Poland with 1.8 milion men, 2700 tanks and 1000 armored cars as well as 10.000 artillery pieces.

In the West Germany had roughly 350.000-370.000 men with about 300 artillery pieces, 30-50 pz Is and an unknown number of armored cars (not exceeding 100).

We can run the sources and do the add/subbstract game and the end effect will still be the same, virtually 100% of effective german forces were in Poland, the 350.000 men in the west had between them a brigade worth of heavy equipment and there were no reserves.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
well equipped men.
Since 2 fast divisions had armored cars instead of tanks and allies outnumbered Germans in trucks and artillery, regular soldiers were equipped the same as their Polish or French counterparts.

In 1939 everything that could drive, run or walk and shoot was in Poland, there were no "millions" of men, there were just about 2 milion men and the name of the game was shortage, Germany didnt have enough tanks, trucks, guns which is why all of the active hardware was in Poland and none if it in the West let alone in reserve.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
These man had fought for Franco,
Please tell me you're f*cking with me? Those couple of thousands of Germans in the Condor Legion are supposed to count for what?
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
retaken Austria and several other places,
Without a shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
now there was no way that we were in a position to go to the aid of Poland
Land your army in France, roll over the pathetic militias defending the Western border of Germany, do not betray Poland in Abbeville and put pressure on the French to move with you, yeah there were ways but they required actually fighting instead of declaring war and meeting with France over tea and crumpets deciding arbitraly that Poland has fallen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
at this time but we did got to war to try and free them.
Nope, you declared war and did nothing, going to war involves actuall fighting and beyond a few token actions absolutely meaningless for the war effort neither UK nor France did anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Now there were a lot of other countries around who just sat on their hands and made a fortune selling weapons to any one that had cash.
You were not in the position to do that, Churchill was smart enough to know that despite Hitlers sympathetic outlook towards UK once Europe gets bent over there's no way Germany would allow independent power like UK at its doorstep.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
It took the might of Russia, America, Britain and it's Commonwealth Allies to defeat Germany and even then it took a lot of blood and guts to do that, so if any one thinks Germany could have been smashed when it invaded Poland really is a couple sandwiches short of a picnic.
The difference between Germany of 1939 and Germany of 1944 is gigantic, Germany of 1943 or 44 is Germany thats economically many times larger then it was in 1939, 39 was the only time when Germans did not have effective reserves on a strategic level or any chance to shift troops.

This is another reason why Polish war effort is skimmed over, betraying Poland the West (UK and France) rewrote their history completely ignoring the fact that Poles completely tied the Wehrmacht, this made the franco-british treason at Abbeville seem logical.

Of course you could, instead of issuing blanket statements tell us why did Germans have only 200 guns to oppose the French at Ruhr, why werent there any armored or mechanized reserves in Germany? Where were the units Germans could shift to face the Anglo-French invasion if it happened?

Germany 1939, no reserves, 100% forces tied in combat for 3 weeks, 20% of their motorised forces destroyed or inoperational by the second week and militias defending their western border, those are the facts that no amount of your blanket statements can shift or change, the only thing that was lacking was guts and honour by French and British.

Also Lee could you explain to us the phenomenon of Abbeville? On 12th of September Brits and French meet in Abbeville and decide not to help Poland on the grounds that it has lost the war already.

At the same time French inform the Poles that they are attacking and Germans are withdrawing their forces to meet the french threat.

So thats treason of Poland by both UK and France right there.

At the same time Poland which supposedly already lost the war launches the offensive that will become the battle of Bzura, from 9 to 22 September 250.000 Poles tie 500.000 Germans along with entire German armored, mechanized and airforce elements.

Polish army is succesfull throught the initial 7 days of the battle, from 9 to 16th Sept.

So not only did UK and France betray Poland and decided Poland has lost while polish troops were massacring 5 german infantry divisions, not only did they lie to Poles so Poles pushed their offensive well past their offensive capacity, the French and Brits fully aware of the opportunity Poles created still decided to sit it out.

Stop issuing blanket statements Lee and argue with facts, Britian and France betrayed Poland in a bloody fugly fashion, period.
May 27th, 2010  
Naddoður
 
 
In 1939 Britain and France signed a series of military agreements with Poland that contained very specific promises. The leaders of Poland understood very clearly that they had no chance against Germany alone.

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain stated in the House of Commons on March 31, 1939.

"As the House is aware, certain consultations are now proceeding with other Governments. In order to make perfectly clear the position of His Majesty's Government in the meantime before those consultations are concluded, I now have to inform the House that during that period, in the event of any action which clearly threatened Polish independence, and which the Polish Government accordingly considered it vital to resist with their national forces, His Majesty's Government would feel themselves bound at once to lend the Polish Government all support in their power. They have given the Polish Government an assurance to this effect. I may add that the French Government have authorized me to make it plain that they stand in the same position in this matter as do His Majesty's Government."

Having secured a guarantee, the Poles now took steps toward coordinating their defensive preparations with the British. On April 4, 1939, Poland's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Józef Beck, visited London for talks with Prime Minister Chamberlain and Lord Halifax, the Foreign Secretary. The content of these talks was described in an official communiqué sent from London to Warsaw on April 6th:

"The conversations with M. Beck have covered a wide field and shown that the two Governments are in complete agreement upon certain general principles. It was agreed that the two countries were prepared to enter into an agreement of a permanent and reciprocal character to replace the present temporary and unilateral assurance given by His Majesty's Government to the Polish Government. Pending the completion of the permanent agreement, M. Beck gave His Majesty's Government an assurance that the Polish Government would consider themselves under an obligation to render assistance to His Majesty's Government under the same conditions as those contained in the temporary assurance already given by His Majesty's Government to Poland."
Shortly thereafter a formal agreement between Poland and Britain was signed which clearly stated "If Germany attacks Poland His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom will at once come to the help of Poland."

Whereas British support of Poland was a relatively recent diplomatic development, Poland's alliance with the French had a long history. The first French efforts to buttress Poland against Germany went back to 1921. In that year, Raymond Poincaré, soon to become president of the FrenchRepublic, had stated "Everything orders us to support Poland: The [Versailles] Treaty, the plebiscite, loyalty, the present and the future interest of France, and the permanence of peace."
To this end France had sealed a mutual assistance pact with Poland on February 21, 1921. According to Article One of this pact France and Poland agreed to "consult each other on all questions of foreign policy which concern both states." Furthermore, Article Three made it clear that "If, notwithstanding the sincerely peaceful views and intentions of the two contracting states, either or both of them should be attacked without giving provocation,the two governments shall take concerted measures for the defense of their territory and the protection of their legitimate interests."

This agreement for mutual defense was then augmented on September 15, 1922 by a formal military alliance signed by Marshal Foch and General Sokoski. This agreement stated explicitly "In case of German aggression against either Poland or France, or both, the two nations would aid each other to the fullest extent."

Seventeen years later, Poland and France, facing growing tension with Germany, found it necessary to reaffirm the defensive alliance they had formed in the wake of World War I. In mid-May of 1939, Poland's Minister of War, General Tadeusz Kasprzycki, visited Paris for a series of talks. At issue for Kasprzycki was clarifying the terms under which France would assist Poland militarily. These talks resulted in the Franco-Polish Military Convention which, according to historian Richard Watt, stated that "on the outbreak of war between Germany and Poland, the French would immediately undertake air action against Germany. It was also agreed that on the third day of French mobilization its army would launch a diversionary offensive into German territory, which would be followed by a major military offensive of the full French army to take place no later than fifteen days after mobilization."

Unfortunately, when Germany attacked, Poland was almost totally and completely betrayed by its democratic "friends". While Britain and France did declare war, French troops made a brief advance toward the Siegfried Line on Germany's western frontier and immediately stopped upon meeting German resistance

This is very significant since Hitler had concentrated almost all German military forces in the east, and France had one of the strongest armies in the world. Had France attacked Germany in a serious way as promised, the results could have been very serious, if not disastrous for the Germans.

Instead, Hitler was able to win a complete victory over Poland and then mobilize his forces for a devastating offensive in the west in the next year.

The British and French betrayal of Poland in 1939 was not only dishonest, it was a military stupidity of truly monumental dimensions. Unfortunately, more betrayals would follow. Contrary to their assurances to the Poles Britain and France would agree to allow Russia to keep the parts of Poland seized as part of their deal with Hitler in 1939.

A crowning humiliation of the Poles was the refusal of their British "friends" to allow the free Polish army to march in the victory parade at the end of the war for fear of offending a Soviet puppet government in Lublin.
May 27th, 2010  
lljadw
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panzercracker
No, they declared war and did absolutely nothing beyond declaring war, thats outright focking treason.

That sir is a lie, normally in case of a moron like lldjaw i'd say its a mistake but you're smart enough to say you're lying.

Lets be done with blanket statements, Germany had roughly 2900 tanks, 1100 armored and recon cars and about 2.4 milion men worth of active troops.

Germany attacked Poland with 1.8 milion men, 2700 tanks and 1000 armored cars as well as 10.000 artillery pieces.

In the West Germany had roughly 350.000-370.000 men with about 300 artillery pieces, 30-50 pz Is and an unknown number of armored cars (not exceeding 100).

We can run the sources and do the add/subbstract game and the end effect will still be the same, virtually 100% of effective german forces were in Poland, the 350.000 men in the west had between them a brigade worth of heavy equipment and there were no reserves.

Since 2 fast divisions had armored cars instead of tanks and allies outnumbered Germans in trucks and artillery, regular soldiers were equipped the same as their Polish or French counterparts.

In 1939 everything that could drive, run or walk and shoot was in Poland, there were no "millions" of men, there were just about 2 milion men and the name of the game was shortage, Germany didnt have enough tanks, trucks, guns which is why all of the active hardware was in Poland and none if it in the West let alone in reserve.

Please tell me you're f*cking with me? Those couple of thousands of Germans in the Condor Legion are supposed to count for what?

Without a shot.

Land your army in France, roll over the pathetic militias defending the Western border of Germany, do not betray Poland in Abbeville and put pressure on the French to move with you, yeah there were ways but they required actually fighting instead of declaring war and meeting with France over tea and crumpets deciding arbitraly that Poland has fallen.

Nope, you declared war and did nothing, going to war involves actuall fighting and beyond a few token actions absolutely meaningless for the war effort neither UK nor France did anything.

You were not in the position to do that, Churchill was smart enough to know that despite Hitlers sympathetic outlook towards UK once Europe gets bent over there's no way Germany would allow independent power like UK at its doorstep.

The difference between Germany of 1939 and Germany of 1944 is gigantic, Germany of 1943 or 44 is Germany thats economically many times larger then it was in 1939, 39 was the only time when Germans did not have effective reserves on a strategic level or any chance to shift troops.

This is another reason why Polish war effort is skimmed over, betraying Poland the West (UK and France) rewrote their history completely ignoring the fact that Poles completely tied the Wehrmacht, this made the franco-british treason at Abbeville seem logical.

Of course you could, instead of issuing blanket statements tell us why did Germans have only 200 guns to oppose the French at Ruhr, why werent there any armored or mechanized reserves in Germany? Where were the units Germans could shift to face the Anglo-French invasion if it happened?

Germany 1939, no reserves, 100% forces tied in combat for 3 weeks, 20% of their motorised forces destroyed or inoperational by the second week and militias defending their western border, those are the facts that no amount of your blanket statements can shift or change, the only thing that was lacking was guts and honour by French and British.

Also Lee could you explain to us the phenomenon of Abbeville? On 12th of September Brits and French meet in Abbeville and decide not to help Poland on the grounds that it has lost the war already.

At the same time French inform the Poles that they are attacking and Germans are withdrawing their forces to meet the french threat.

So thats treason of Poland by both UK and France right there.

At the same time Poland which supposedly already lost the war launches the offensive that will become the battle of Bzura, from 9 to 22 September 250.000 Poles tie 500.000 Germans along with entire German armored, mechanized and airforce elements.

Polish army is succesfull throught the initial 7 days of the battle, from 9 to 16th Sept.

So not only did UK and France betray Poland and decided Poland has lost while polish troops were massacring 5 german infantry divisions, not only did they lie to Poles so Poles pushed their offensive well past their offensive capacity, the French and Brits fully aware of the opportunity Poles created still decided to sit it out.

Stop issuing blanket statements Lee and argue with facts, Britian and France betrayed Poland in a bloody fugly fashion, period.
This moron will not say publicky what he's thinking of you,because he will remain polite.
But to refresh your"memory",this moron will state the following
1)Britain and France never expected to be obliged to fight:they were thinking that words would be enough to deter Hitler,but Der Fuhrer was not impressed.
2)Militarily Britain could not prevent Hitler to attack Poland and could not help Poland .
3)France could not help Poland because after a few days Poland had,strategically, already lost the war,although the Poles continued the fight valiantly and because France was not ready :that the French had a lot of tanks and artillery,spreaded over the whole of the country,does not mean that they could be ready in a few days .
4)If the Polish colonels were neglecting military realities,then ,they were very stupid .
These moron does not great you
May 27th, 2010  
lljadw
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naddoður
In 1939 Britain and France signed a series of military agreements with Poland that contained very specific promises. The leaders of Poland understood very clearly that they had no chance against Germany alone.

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain stated in the House of Commons on March 31, 1939.

"As the House is aware, certain consultations are now proceeding with other Governments. In order to make perfectly clear the position of His Majesty's Government in the meantime before those consultations are concluded, I now have to inform the House that during that period, in the event of any action which clearly threatened Polish independence, and which the Polish Government accordingly considered it vital to resist with their national forces, His Majesty's Government would feel themselves bound at once to lend the Polish Government all support in their power. They have given the Polish Government an assurance to this effect. I may add that the French Government have authorized me to make it plain that they stand in the same position in this matter as do His Majesty's Government."

Having secured a guarantee, the Poles now took steps toward coordinating their defensive preparations with the British. On April 4, 1939, Poland's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Józef Beck, visited London for talks with Prime Minister Chamberlain and Lord Halifax, the Foreign Secretary. The content of these talks was described in an official communiqué sent from London to Warsaw on April 6th:

"The conversations with M. Beck have covered a wide field and shown that the two Governments are in complete agreement upon certain general principles. It was agreed that the two countries were prepared to enter into an agreement of a permanent and reciprocal character to replace the present temporary and unilateral assurance given by His Majesty's Government to the Polish Government. Pending the completion of the permanent agreement, M. Beck gave His Majesty's Government an assurance that the Polish Government would consider themselves under an obligation to render assistance to His Majesty's Government under the same conditions as those contained in the temporary assurance already given by His Majesty's Government to Poland."
Shortly thereafter a formal agreement between Poland and Britain was signed which clearly stated "If Germany attacks Poland His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom will at once come to the help of Poland."

Whereas British support of Poland was a relatively recent diplomatic development, Poland's alliance with the French had a long history. The first French efforts to buttress Poland against Germany went back to 1921. In that year, Raymond Poincaré, soon to become president of the FrenchRepublic, had stated "Everything orders us to support Poland: The [Versailles] Treaty, the plebiscite, loyalty, the present and the future interest of France, and the permanence of peace."
To this end France had sealed a mutual assistance pact with Poland on February 21, 1921. According to Article One of this pact France and Poland agreed to "consult each other on all questions of foreign policy which concern both states." Furthermore, Article Three made it clear that "If, notwithstanding the sincerely peaceful views and intentions of the two contracting states, either or both of them should be attacked without giving provocation,the two governments shall take concerted measures for the defense of their territory and the protection of their legitimate interests."

This agreement for mutual defense was then augmented on September 15, 1922 by a formal military alliance signed by Marshal Foch and General Sokoski. This agreement stated explicitly "In case of German aggression against either Poland or France, or both, the two nations would aid each other to the fullest extent."

Seventeen years later, Poland and France, facing growing tension with Germany, found it necessary to reaffirm the defensive alliance they had formed in the wake of World War I. In mid-May of 1939, Poland's Minister of War, General Tadeusz Kasprzycki, visited Paris for a series of talks. At issue for Kasprzycki was clarifying the terms under which France would assist Poland militarily. These talks resulted in the Franco-Polish Military Convention which, according to historian Richard Watt, stated that "on the outbreak of war between Germany and Poland, the French would immediately undertake air action against Germany. It was also agreed that on the third day of French mobilization its army would launch a diversionary offensive into German territory, which would be followed by a major military offensive of the full French army to take place no later than fifteen days after mobilization."

Unfortunately, when Germany attacked, Poland was almost totally and completely betrayed by its democratic "friends". While Britain and France did declare war, French troops made a brief advance toward the Siegfried Line on Germany's western frontier and immediately stopped upon meeting German resistance

This is very significant since Hitler had concentrated almost all German military forces in the east, and France had one of the strongest armies in the world. Had France attacked Germany in a serious way as promised, the results could have been very serious, if not disastrous for the Germans.

Instead, Hitler was able to win a complete victory over Poland and then mobilize his forces for a devastating offensive in the west in the next year.

The British and French betrayal of Poland in 1939 was not only dishonest, it was a military stupidity of truly monumental dimensions. Unfortunately, more betrayals would follow. Contrary to their assurances to the Poles Britain and France would agree to allow Russia to keep the parts of Poland seized as part of their deal with Hitler in 1939.

A crowning humiliation of the Poles was the refusal of their British "friends" to allow the free Polish army to march in the victory parade at the end of the war for fear of offending a Soviet puppet government in Lublin.
1) to lend all support in their power:they did lend all support in their power,it was neglectable,because the support available was neglectable.
2)the official communiqué from april 6thnly meaningless blah blah
3) there wer no assurances to the Poles about Russia.
4)If the Poles were thinking that,in 1945,Britain and the USA,better the USA,Britain was unable to do anything,would start a new war to roll-back the SU,then,they were not naive,but stupid .Roosevelt,nor Truman cared about Poland,only about the votes of the ethnic Poles in the USA.Poland was not the navel of the world and the world had no obligations to Poland .