Royal Newfoundland Regiment cap badge

About Royal Newfoundland Regiment cap badge


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March 2nd, 2005   #1
SigPig
 

Royal Newfoundland Regiment cap badge info


The Royal Newfoundland Regiment wears a cap badge displaying a caribou's head within a wreath surmounted by a crown; beneath is a ribbon bearing the legend "ROYAL NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT". Their tradition is that while soldiers must keep their badge clean, they are not permitted to polish it.

This dates back to the Battle of Beaumont Hamel, one of the many engagements of the First Battle of the Somme in July 1916. In order that the commanders of the formations and units could easily identify their own, the soldiers had polished brass discs attached to their ammo pouches. (This is obviously before the days that camouflage doctrine was refined). Problem was, not only could the commanders see their men, so could the Germans. It was just one more error that contributed to the debacle of the Somme, and particularly Beaumont Hamel.

On 1 July 1916, as part of the British 29th Division, 88th Brigade, 801 soldiers of the Newfoundland Regiment scrambled out of their trenches and moved towards their objective. Half an hour later, it was all over: 68 soldiers answered roll call after the battle; all the officers were casualties.

This is an extreme condensation of the story. Bottom line is that, as a memorial of this black day, the Royal Newfoundland Regiment do not polish their cap badges.

J


\"What are you talking about? One, two, three, fo-- oh, crap.\"
- G. Edwin Bergstrom, Arlington VA, 15 Jan 1943
 
April 22nd, 2005   #2
Desert_Eagle
 
Should of thought about doing that before


A \'good\' landing is one from which you can walk away. A \'great\' landing is one after which they can use the plane again.
 
March 12th, 2009   #3
51charlie
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SigPig
The Royal Newfoundland Regiment wears a cap badge displaying a caribou's head within a wreath surmounted by a crown; beneath is a ribbon bearing the legend "ROYAL NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT". Their tradition is that while soldiers must keep their badge clean, they are not permitted to polish it.

This dates back to the Battle of Beaumont Hamel, one of the many engagements of the First Battle of the Somme in July 1916. In order that the commanders of the formations and units could easily identify their own, the soldiers had polished brass discs attached to their ammo pouches. (This is obviously before the days that camouflage doctrine was refined). Problem was, not only could the commanders see their men, so could the Germans. It was just one more error that contributed to the debacle of the Somme, and particularly Beaumont Hamel.

On 1 July 1916, as part of the British 29th Division, 88th Brigade, 801 soldiers of the Newfoundland Regiment scrambled out of their trenches and moved towards their objective. Half an hour later, it was all over: 68 soldiers answered roll call after the battle; all the officers were casualties.

This is an extreme condensation of the story. Bottom line is that, as a memorial of this black day, the Royal Newfoundland Regiment do not polish their cap badges.

J
Somewhat right, but the part about the "brass discs" is wrong. Tin triangles were placed on the backs of soldiers so the commanders could track movement, as well as liason aircraft and arty observers so they could track as well. This is the reason why if you have the old Queens Crown brass hat badge it's not required to be polished. I've actually purchased several of these and wear one, yes I'm a member of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment.

Beautmont Hamel was basically one mistake after another, Hawthorne Ridge not being taken right away, the tin triangles, cuts in the enemy barbwire, luck wasn't on the Newfoundlander's side that day.
 
March 15th, 2009   #4
tomtom22
 
 
A sad story all around.


"It doesn't take a hero to order men into battle. It takes a hero to be one of those men who goes into battle." - Norman Schwarskopf, Commander of Desert Storm Operations