"Get it in writing" - What's the deal? -


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August 6th, 2005   #1
Toyuzu
 

"Get it in writing" - What's the deal? info


So I keep hearing that I should get everything in writing from the recruiter when it comes time to sign. Why the paranoia? Are they really that deceptive?

What items specifically should I try to get documented?

I don't like the idea of forcing a contract. I guess I prefer the old fashioned "gentleman's agreement" idea but if the experienced collective advises, I'd better pay heed. Your thoughts?
 
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August 7th, 2005   #2
RnderSafe
 
 
Would you finance a vehicle without reading the contract? A house?

It is the same principle.

Recruiters are there to sell you the military, they will tell you how beautiful and wonderful it is .. and during their speeches, they may tell you certain things are possible. Without having these things in writing, they are not a guarantee.

It's just common sense to make certain everything you've asked for that is possible is in writing before you sign your life away to Uncle Sam for four or more years. Otherwise, you may want infantry - but because you didn't read the contract or get it in writing, your MOS is entirely different.
 
August 7th, 2005   #3
Toyuzu
 
Okay, that makes sense. The recruiter is advising me to select a short list of preferred MOS's in case my first choice is not available. Is that just a tactic to allow the Army to put me wherever they need a body?

I guess I should ask for some sort of document that would guarantee I would be placed in one of my preferred jobs on the list.

Are there any other details I should get documented?

I understand my first post assignment could depend largely on my MOS, but what are the chances I could be guaranteed a first post in the U.S.? I think that would be ideal, so that my wife and kids are better able to visit family - kind of important I think for the first few years to get them acclimated to military life. Especially if/when I get deployed.
 
August 7th, 2005   #4
RnderSafe
 
 
What MOS is it that you want?
 
August 7th, 2005   #5
Toyuzu
 
I'd like to make it a goal to be a helicopter pilot, but barring that (no college degree, 31 years old) I'll consider something I already have experience with - Motor transport operator, light vehicle repair. I'm also looking into Fire support and EOD, since they are both much needed positions right now.
 
August 7th, 2005   #6
RnderSafe
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyuzu
I'd like to make it a goal to be a helicopter pilot, but barring that (no college degree, 31 years old) I'll consider something I already have experience with - Motor transport operator, light vehicle repair. I'm also looking into Fire support and EOD, since they are both much needed positions right now.
The first thing to do is decide which MOS you want - the Army will guarantee your MOS. If you want 13F, for instance, it will be in your contract.

EOD is a very serious field and you will spend most of your first year in school. It is, however, highly rewarding and offers many opportunities inside of the military as well as outside in the civilian world. I wouldn't trade my career in EOD for anything, it is probably the most memorable of my military service - now that I'm an old fella, they only let me render safe push pins.
 
August 7th, 2005   #7
Toyuzu
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RnderSafe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyuzu
I'd like to make it a goal to be a helicopter pilot, but barring that (no college degree, 31 years old) I'll consider something I already have experience with - Motor transport operator, light vehicle repair. I'm also looking into Fire support and EOD, since they are both much needed positions right now.
The first thing to do is decide which MOS you want - the Army will guarantee your MOS. If you want 13F, for instance, it will be in your contract.

EOD is a very serious field and you will spend most of your first year in school. It is, however, highly rewarding and offers many opportunities inside of the military as well as outside in the civilian world. I wouldn't trade my career in EOD for anything, it is probably the most memorable of my military service - now that I'm an old fella, they only let me render safe push pins.
You never know - with modern technology, even pushpins could be explosive.

EOD to me is one of the most intruguing MOS's. Also the most challenging and that makes it more attractive to me. It's good to see an endorsement for EOD from someone with first-hand experience. I believe the minimum service commitment for EOD is 5 years, right? If I do pick EOD though, I'll probably just sign for 6 years. It seems like the type of field to be career-oriented in.
 
August 7th, 2005   #8
RnderSafe
 
 
I believe you can still sign for four, but do not quote me on that. They do offer a bonus for 5 yrs and up, however.

It is definitely a career oriented field, and even if/when you move on, it will still play a huge factor in whatever you do. A vast majority of the assignments I got outside of EOD were because I am a tech.

Have you talked to your Mrs. about your interests? Family support is very imporant in any part of the military - but even more so in fields like EOD. It can be very stressful, and it will eventually affect your personal life.
 
August 7th, 2005   #9
Toyuzu
 
My wife is a very big part of this decision. She is incredibly supportive of any choice I make. She always has been. The thought of me embarking on a career in EOD does make her a bit nervous though.

The stress issue - if you're talking about the stress of dealing with dangerous ordinance I think I can handle that. I'm sure the training is sufficient to instill some measure of competence. I know there will always be the nervous "moment of truth" though.

I'm currently reading through scads of web-info on the EOD field.
 
August 7th, 2005   #10
RnderSafe
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyuzu
The stress issue - if you're talking about the stress of dealing with dangerous ordinance I think I can handle that. I'm sure the training is sufficient to instill some measure of competence. I know there will always be the nervous "moment of truth" though. .
It is a bit more complicated than that - but if you have a strong support structure, most everything that will eventually come up, will work itself out.

Our training is more than sufficient, very technical and exact. Funnily enough, EOD is actually a very controlled field, even if the ordnance you work with is not.
 



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